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Loving Couples (1964) challenges motherhood and patriarchy

TCM will feature films from 12 decades—and representing 44 countries—totaling 100 classic and current titles all created by women. Read more about this here!  Loving Couples begins with a bird’s eye view–black and white tiles, over which patients at a maternity clinic pass on their way to appointments with their doctors. Likewise, we see the women […]

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Sofia Coppola’s films highlight different types of isolation

When looking at Sofia Coppola’s filmography during quarantine, it’s evident how the theme of isolation and its effects on young women is prevalent in several of her movies.

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Esmer’s 10 to 11 evokes simultaneous feelings of anxiety and calm

Amidst newspaper stacks and overfilled bookshelves, “Mithat” (Mithat Esmer) sits alone in his easychair. He wears a face of wearied determination as if he’s just served an ultimatum, which he has. According to the authorities, he has only a few weeks to clear out of this apartment so that the building can be demolished and rebuilt. As the weight of this news settles in, I hear only the mismatched ticking of dozens of clocks. The sense of urgency they carry insists on being felt, and I oblige.

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Pelin Esmer’s 10 to 11 uses sound to invoke feeling

You can watch Pelin Esmer’s 10 to 11 as part of Turner Classic Movies “Women Make Film” series on 9/16 at 5:15 AM. TCM will feature films from 12 decades—and representing 44 countries—totaling 100 classic and current titles all created by women. Read more about this here!  Pelin Esmer wrote and directed 10 to 11 based on […]

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Lucrecia Martel’s La Cienaga explores Maria Virgine visions, or are they delusions?

Mary’s essential qualities are faithfulness, devotion, humility, and purity. This imagery is in stark contrast to La Ciénaga, between the rampant mess of Mecha’s household against the gravitas that comes with Catholicism. Martel explores her favorite subject in the film––the troubled mind.

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Kathleen Collins’s film and fiction are still delightfully fresh

Even in her fiction, Collins was thinking about the art of point of view and its role in film.

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