Bechdel-Wallace List

Kathleen Collins’s film and fiction are still delightfully fresh

Even in her fiction, Collins was thinking about the art of point of view and its role in film.

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Lotte Reiniger was a talented and inventive pioneer in animation 

The breadth of Reiniger’s work cannot be understated, as it stretches across genres and countries.

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Hollow City, El Camino, and a look at the world through a child’s eyes

At first glance, El Camino and Hollow City might not seem like they have much in common. Yet, after having watched the two, I find that they complement each other remarkably well. Both offer the beginnings of a coming-of-age story in which the audience looks at the world through a child’s point of view. Together, they offer both parallels and juxtapositions of how such a child must grow — as seen through the lenses of death, setting and agency, and friendship.

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A Ghost Army in a Sleepwalking Land is a story worth hearing

Prata’s work, Sleepwalking Land, is an adaptation of Mia Couto’s novel of the same name about wartime in Mozambique between 1977-1992 and the common people’s struggles to survive the conflict. Quite often, when a woman creates a film, she is labeled a “female filmmaker.” Her work is limited by her gender role and the stigma which comes attached to it. Men are not labeled in the same fashion. Teresa Prata, the director and writer of Sleepwalking Land, separates herself and her work from that label.

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The discovery of Wanda’s voice

It’s delicious to see this kind of character taking up so much space on screen: unkempt, dazed, and aimless, with occasional moments of alertness to take pleasure in something tiny, just because she wants to. 

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Cheryl Dunye’s Dunyementaries: friends’ conversations as an art form

Cheryl Dunye’s first feature, The Watermelon Woman, plays with autofiction in film: the plot follows “Cheryl,” played by Cheryl, as she “tries to make a documentary” about an actor from a 1930s film known only as “The Watermelon Woman.”

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