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Don’t let history wipe out women’s cinematic footprint

Fourteen years prior to Bigelow’s win, another female director of a feature film was also awarded the golden statuette. In 1996, writer and director Marleen Gorris won the Best Foreign Film category for her feature Antonia’s Line. If we’re talking about firsts, then this is absolutely another one to permanently inscribe upon our memory.

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Claire Denis’s unique genre of uncomfortable horror

Claire Denis masterfully uses discomfort and disturbance to create tension in all her movies, producing her own brand of horror.

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Social Justice Auteur: A Celebration of the Work of Ava DuVernay

Social Justice Auteur: A Celebration of the Work of Ava DuVernay By FF2 Intern Julia Lasker Ava DuVernay is a filmmaker that, in 2020, you need to know. She began creating films in 2010 and since then has become a historic name in the cinematic world. She was the first Black woman to win an […]

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Krane’s Confectionary Shows How Women Police Each Other

TCM will feature films from 12 decades—and representing 44 countries—totaling 100 classic and current titles all created by women. Read more about this here!  Many of us who have made feminism a big part of our lives are aware that women can often police other women just as much as we are all oppressed by men. […]

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Zero Motivation Isn’t Quite Sure What It’s Trying To Say About Israel

TCM will feature films from 12 decades—and representing 44 countries—totaling 100 classic and current titles all created by women. Read more about this here!  The war comedy is an odd genre, considering the subject material it attempts to make humorous. When I’ve see war comedies based on the American military, I’ve often liked or disliked the […]

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Nixing ‘Dixie’: The Chicks, politics in art, and the power of language

Anyone familiar with the old controversy surrounding the Chicks knows that when they were labeled as politically outspoken, it wasn’t exactly meant to be a compliment. Even I, with my limited knowledge of the whole affair, felt its negative connotation. Upon watching Barbara Kopple’s documentary on the subject, Shut Up & Sing (2006), I had only a shadow of an idea of what I would be watching. But boy, was I in for an eye-opener. 

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