FF2 Media welcomes Guest Posts from writers who self-identify as women. Do you have a passion that you want to write about? Send us a pitch: witaswan@msn.com. We pay experienced writers $100 for each post (of approximately 1,000 words per post). We also need interns for administrative back-up. Compensation for interns begins at $15 per hour.

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Delia Kropp Is Subtle & Sincere in Onscreen Debut

FF2 Guest post by Muffy Koster

Prominent Chicago actress, director, and LGBTQ advocate Delia Kropp makes her feature film debut in Landlocked, a heartfelt story of reconnection from indie director Timothy Hall. The film follows “Nick” (Dustin Gooch), an aspiring restaurateur, and his estranged mother “Briana” (Kropp), a transgender woman, as they reunite over the course of a road trip to scatter the ashes of Nick’s other, cisgender mother.  read more.

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Three Must-See Films at NYC’s 2021 South Asian Film Festival

WOMB Women of My Billion still at NYC SAFF
The female-led productions in this year’s NYC SAFF tell timely and timeless stories that urge us to shed our stereotypes.
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Greek God Dionysus Returns as ‘Hurricane Diane’ to Confront Climate Change

Rami Margron in Hurricane Diane
With Huntington Theatre Company's Hurricane Diane, director Jenny Koons and her cast pack a punch in 90 minutes.
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Burlesque Performers Keep Strutting Through the Pandemic

HoneyTree Evil Eye burlesque
When the pandemic first hit, many artists and performers had to rethink how they connected with their audiences. Burlesque was no different.
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‘Never Have I Ever’ Felt So Seen by a Netflix TV Show

Mindy Kahling press Never Have I Ever
Before Never Have I Ever, when was the last time you watched a show about a South Asian girl who grapples with her Indian-American identity?
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In ‘frank: sonnets,’ Diane Seuss’ New Poems are Both ‘Right Now’ and ‘Back Then’

Diane Seuss poet
n Diane Seuss's frank: sonnets, the durability of the sonnet form stakes its claim as it exposes that which has often been held sacred.
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