Aisling Walsh’s ‘Maudie’ a fitting tribute to the art of Maud Lewis

Aisling Walsh’s ‘Maudie’ a fitting tribute to the art of Maud Lewis

In the traditional artist-muse love stories, we’ve seen remarkably few focused on female artists and their male muse. And rarer still would be the on-screen relationship in the new Irish-Canadian film Maudie, starring Sally Hawkins and Ethan Hawke. Based on the cheerful, vibrant art of folk artist Maud Lewis (Sally Hawkins) plays a Nova Scotia…

Senior Contributor Lesley Coffin

Senior Contributor Lesley Coffin

Contributor Lesley Coffin is Editor-in-Chief of the online film journal Movies, Film, Cinema and host of the Chicago industry podcast "From Lakeshore Drive to Hollywood." A writer with a masters degree from NYU’s Gallatin School in biographical studies and star theory. She wrote the biography on Lew Ayres (Lew Ayres: Hollywood’s Conscientious Objector) and Hitchcock’s Casting (Hitchcock’s…

First-time screenwriter finds comedy, closure in ‘The Women’s Balcony’

First-time screenwriter finds comedy, closure in ‘The Women’s Balcony’

​When first-time screenwriter Shlomit Nehama wrote The Women’s Balcony, she anticipated that making a universal film would be a losing battle. In order to capture the emotions of the characters and daily lives of a close knit Mizrahi community, she needed to use detail and specificity. The approach worked and Balcony become the number one…

Salima Koroma's hip-hop documentary 'Bad Rap' promotes cultural inclusivity

Salima Koroma's hip-hop documentary 'Bad Rap' promotes cultural inclusivity

Despite hip-hop’s history of increasing the visibility of black and Latino urban youth culture in America, it’s also struggled to include all minorities in the movement. Asian-American artists have struggled to find acceptance, even as hip-hop music found mainstream, commercial success on the global stage. Director Salima Koroma’s interest in this excluded minority group motivated…

Petra Volpe, director of ‘The Divine Order,' takes lighthearted approach to suffrage

Petra Volpe, director of ‘The Divine Order,' takes lighthearted approach to suffrage

***Update*** The 16th Annual Tribeca Film Festival Nora Ephron Prize winner. The Nora Ephron Prize: Petra Volpe, writer/director of The Divine Order (Switzerland). Jurors Dianna Agron, Joy Bryant, Diane Lane, Zoe Lister-Jones and Christina Ricci awarded the film for its “intrepid and compassionate storytelling, beautiful cinematography (by a woman), complex characterization of the female experience, seamless…

‘American Fable’ director talks Richard Schiff, politics and directing chickens

‘American Fable’ director talks Richard Schiff, politics and directing chickens

American Fable, the new thriller from Anne Hamilton, is one of the most visually spectacular indie in years. Made with a big sense of scope, and small budget, she’s turned what could be an intimate family drama into a spectacular fantasy thriller about the end of girl’s childhood. Starring newcomer Peyton Kennedy, and familiar faces…

Nora Ephron and a Baking Bible: Celebrating SWAN Day

Nora Ephron and a Baking Bible: Celebrating SWAN Day

To celebrate the 10th Annual International SWAN (Support Women Artists Now) Day on Saturday, March 25, 2017, the FF2 Media team is highlighting their favorite female artists.The holiday, also observed throughout the months of March and April, highlights the creative feats of female artists and their audiences. Senior Contributor Lesley Coffin: To celebrating SWAN Day,…

'The Last Laugh' director encourages humor, empathy in new documentary

'The Last Laugh' director encourages humor, empathy in new documentary

Are there topics too horrible or controversial to make jokes about? Abortion, slavery, race, 9/11. Should the Holocaust be considered off limits to comedians? According to Director Ferne Pearlstein and the comedians and subjects interviewed for her new documentary The Last Laugh, that’s the wrong approach. Humor can be empowering for survivors, and have a…

Ann Marie Fleming on 'Window Horses,' diversity in animation

Ann Marie Fleming on 'Window Horses,' diversity in animation

The annual New York International Children’s Film Festival is one of the premiere events to highlight “alternative” animation and family programming. Not only have they regularly highlighted Academy Award contenders in animation, but discovered new talents in independent cinema. Ann Marie Fleming was one of those filmmakers a few years ago when she premiered a…