Currently Browsing: Arts: Literary Arts

Make Them Feel the Feeling: Candice Wuehle’s ‘Monarch’

A white crown floats on a blue background

A creepy doll-face with pink lips and green eyes; the cover of MONARCH by Candice WuehleI could describe Candice Wuehle’s debut novel, Monarch, in a hundred different ways, each as enthusiastic as the last.

Jessica is a teenager in the “middle of the middle”—her father, Dr. Clink, is a professor at a Midwestern University; her mother, Grethe, sells Tupperware (sort of).

Jessica is like a lot of teenagers—she spends an absurd amount of time studying herself in a mirror.… read more.

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Martha Anne Toll: Watching Dancers Rehearse Left a Huge Imprint

FF2 Guest Post by Reanne Rodrigues

Before finding her voice on paper, Martha Anne Toll sought it through movement and music. Now, after having written dozens of fiction pieces, essays, and book reviews, Toll’s debut novel, Three Muses, is set for release this September. I caught up with Martha to discuss how she masterfully puts her own experiences with music and movement into words.… read more.

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Celebrating AAPI Month with Books by 3 Asian American Women

Last December (2021), I had the opportunity to participate in an online class called “Contemporary Personal Narratives by Asian American Women: A Cultural Exploration” with Lori Rotskoff. I’d never taken a literature class outside of college before, but I was very excited to read books by Asian American women.read more.

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Kiku Hughes on Japanese American Inter-Generational Trauma

FF2 Guest Post by Joycelyn Ghansah

On February 19, 1942 – barely two months after the government of Japan executed the military attack on Pearl Harbor (Hawaii) which brought the USA into World War II – President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066.

Since a large population of American citizens with Japanese heritage – including people who had been born in the USA as well as those who had completed the naturalization process – were known to reside on the west coast of the mainland, the American Army worked quickly to build rudimentary “relocation camps” for them.… read more.

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Yan Ge Reflects on “Othering” in ‘Strange Beasts of China’

Yan Ge’s fictional book Strange Beasts of China is making waves. The English translation by Jeremy Tiang came out last year, and the book was heralded as one of the New York Times Editors’ Choice and a Notable Book of 2021 and Washington Post’s Best Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror of 2021.

Strange Beasts of China is comprised of a series of interconnected stories about different “beasts” that the narrator encounters and researches in the fictional Chinese city of Yong’an.… read more.

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Celebrating the Prolific Legacy of Maya Angelou

Today, we celebrate the birthday of Dr. Maya Angelou, a pioneering author, poet, filmmaker and civil rights activist! Maya was incredibly prolific in demonstrating her talent and passion, leaving her mark across the art world in almost every medium. 

Throughout her acclaimed career, Maya often made history.read more.

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