Currently Browsing: Arts: Visual Arts

“Taking Work Out of Its Night” Sheds Light on Exploited Workers

In a minimalist factory in Tetouan, Northern Morocco, women workers in caps, gowns, and gloves prepare shrimp for consumption half a world away in the Netherlands. In Manila, Philippines, low-paid tech workers censor cyberspace. On a cargo ship on an unidentified sea somewhere in the world, a Filipino sailor lives a circumscribed, contained life, moving far less freely than the goods he is helping to transport.read more.

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Bertille Bak and the Almost Comic Futility of Most Labor

In the artificial gloaming of the galleries of the Jeu de Paume, Paris dedicated to artist Bertille Bak’s exhibition, “Abus de souffle” (“Out of Breath”), visitors wander into viewing areas, mid-video, with the awkwardness of late arrivals to the cinema. Screens go blank, speakers go silent, interludes allow for turnover or for settling in.read more.

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Photographer Nona Faustine Illuminates NYC’s History of Slavery

As Americans, it is tempting to try to turn a blind eye to the sheer closeness of our country’s history of slavery. In New York City especially, a city which claims to be one of the most socially progressive in the country, people don’t often look around and confront New York’s involvement with the slave trade.read more.

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Bothered, Bewildered: Wellcome Collection’s “The Cult of Beauty”

Perhaps it was neither a matter of coincidence nor irony that the last stop, the final artwork in the Wellcome Collection’s, “The Cult of Beauty” exhibition in London, was a nearly-ten-foot-tall sculpture of the cumulative ephemera of the artist’s mother’s life. Resembling a static tornado bursting with detritus, the piece consists of a plethora of items such as articles of clothing, personal effects, decorative objects, and more.read more.

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Art Is Political: My Personal Tribute to Faith Ringgold

Faith Ringgold, whose quilts brought new life to the Black American experience, passed away on April 12th, 2024, at age 93. 

She was born Faith Willi Jones in 1930 in Harlem, New York—her identity as a New Yorker seeps through in her work. As a child of the Harlem Renaissance, she was exposed to the legendary arts and music creatives, such as jazz singer Dinah Washington and Duke Ellington.read more.

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Homelessness Through the Lens of Photographer Leah den Bok

Visitors to the Mütter Museum in Philadelphia expect to feel uncomfortable at the very least. A museum of science and medical history, the Mütter displays only a fragment of the over-37,000 objects in its collection: specimens, antique medical equipment, and wax models. Among other infamous specimens, the museum retains a cancerous tumor that was excised from President Grover Cleveland’s hard palate, thoracic tissue from the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth, and a shared liver from the American conjoined twins, Chang and Eng Bunker. read more.

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