Currently Browsing: Interviews

SXSW Grand Jury winner ‘Alice’ questions concepts of marriage, motherhood

*Updated for March 12, 2019: “Alice” wins SXSW Narrative Feature Competition Award-winning writer and director Josephine Mackerras’ first feature film, “Alice,” premiered at the SXSW Film Festival recently. Living around the world, this NYU educated filmmaker delves deeply into how one woman, a wife and mother, reacts to her husband’s double life, leaving them in debt […]

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Judith Godrèche tackles stereotypes by re-writing the script

Judith Godrèche has appeared in more than 30 films since beginning her acting career at just 14 in France. Along with her many roles in French films, she became familiar to American audiences in the film The Man in the Iron Mask, Stoker and The Overnight. But since 2010, she’s started focusing on opportunities behind the […]

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Mandie Fletcher’s ‘Patrick’ offers a classic story of a girl and her dog

Fans of British television comedy no doubt knows the name Mandie Fletcher, or at least a lot of her work. From directing episodes of Black-Adder, Desmond, and Hamish MacBeth, she’s been directing for television for over 25 years. However, it was her work on Absolutely Fabulous that led her first film, the follow up feature […]

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Living with the consequences of rape today in short film ‘Lullaby’ (Part 2)

Camille Kane and her largely female key crew team up with production company NINE X THREE FILMS to bring to life her debut self-written and directed short film Lullaby.

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Living with the consequences of rape today in short film ‘Lullaby’ (Part 1)

Camille Kane and her largely female key crew team up with production company NINE X THREE FILMS to bring to life her debut self-written and directed short film Lullaby.

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Miranda Tapsell gets the rom-com right with ‘Top End Wedding’

The Rom-Com genre is certainly an entity unto itself, but to do it right is no easy task. Top End Wedding, co-written by Miranda Tapsell and Joshua Tyler, is a prime example of how to do it right.  This exceptionally well-balanced, funny, dramatic and heartfelt film takes place in the Tiwi Islands in the Northern […]

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Penny Lane pushes boundaries, finds humor in ‘Hail Satan?’

Boldly daring filmmaker Penny Lane returns to Sundance with her third feature-length documentary Hail Satan? The title itself is certainly eye-catching.  And quite surprisingly, after seeing this film, I was shocked by my changed perspective about the topic.  In fact, I dare you not to have a different outlook, too. Lane, a self-proclaimed rebel herself, delves […]

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Rachel Tunnard talks release of award-winning ‘Adult Life Skills’

Three years later, with Tunnard already in post-production on her next film, international audiences have embraced Adult Life Skills, and it’s no wonder considering despite the sad plot of a woman on the edge of 30 dealing with life after the death of her twin brother, Tunnard create a warm, funny coming-of-age film.

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‘All These Small Moments’ tells modern coming-of-age story

Winter in New York is a classic image, especially in cinema, as everything seems to slow down just for a little while. That idea’s been embraced in the storytelling of Melissa B. Miller Costanza’s low key coming-of-age dramedy All These Small Moments, the story of a teenager taking notice of the world around him, including […]

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Roberta Grossman talks ‘Who Will Write Our History’

Who has the freedom, resources and opportunities to tell the stories of history? The stories of the Oyneg Shabes are some of the courageous individuals who wrote, documented and saved the written histories of the victims of the Warsaw Ghetto as “reporters from hell.” Based on the book by Samuel Kassow, Roberta Grossman’s captured the […]

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Sally Rubin’s doc ‘Hillbilly’ urges different view of Appalachia

In their new film Hillbilly, Sally Rubin and Ashley York look at the people, region and stereotypes that created our image of the people of Appalachia.

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‘That Way Madness Lies’ a devastating, necessary story of family and mental illness

Sandra Luckow has been a working documentarian for more than two decades. Although she’s occasionally included herself in her work, such as the feature Belly Talkers about ventriloquists (one of her other skills). But her new film That Way Madness Lies, is her most personal and painfully revealing film, documenting her brother’s descent due to […]

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Christina Hodson’s ‘Bumblebee’ tackles Transformers franchise with heart and humor

Hodson is one of the women in the genre on the rise in the industry, landing on the Blacklist three times before being tapped for Bumblebee. We’ll next see her name in the DC Universe with Birds of Prey (the Harley Quinn film starring Margot Robbie) and Batgirl. She’ll also be living out a childhood dream: working on an original script with Spielberg.

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Film Forum hosts Q&A with ‘Capernaum’ filmmaker Nadine Labaki

On Friday, December 14, Film Forum screened the film Capernaum from acclaimed director, writer, and actor Nadine Labaki, boasting 18 awards and 16 nominations. Nadine Labaki’s tear-jerking, powerful movie Capernaum follows a young boy of roughly 12 years old in Lebanon. In the film, Labaki takes us through a whirlwind of a story showing the struggle of a child fighting for survival. Capernaum reminds us that for many, the inescapable life stuck in poverty is still a hugely neglected issue.

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Maria Pulera wants to embrace the weird and wild in ‘Between Worlds’

Written and directed by Maria Pulera, the genre-bending Between Worlds weaves supernatural horror and erotic thriller together to create a wild, sometimes campy, often funny ride.

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Romance, class and heists in Stacy Cochran’s ‘Write When You Get Work’

Stacy Cochran takes a similar approach with her new romantic dramedy/heist film Write When You Get Work. In the world of New York high finance and Manhattan private schools, have-not Johnny (Finn Wittrock) pursues his ex-Ruth (Rachel Keller), an admissions officer, and gets entangled in the lives of the Nobles (Emily Mortimer and James Ransone), two haves about to lose everything.

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‘Jeff Tries to Save the World’ in Kendell Goldberg’s debut film

Writer-director Kendell Goldberg, making her feature debut with Jeff Tries to Save the World (an extension of the short she made in college). Despite it’s big title, Goldberg has created an intimate and sweet story about Jeff (played by Jon Heder in one of his best performances) who takes great pleasure in his work as a bowling alley manager.

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The Bostonians 4K Restoration World Premiere—Q&A with James Ivory

The Quad in New York screened the World Premiere 4K Restoration of The Bostonians on November 30th 2018. The film boasts many awards and nominations, and is one of the many proud pieces created by the collaborating partners Director James Ivory and Writer Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. Jhabvala has won two Oscar awards and nominated for […]

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Danish director Pernille Fischer talks inspiration behind ‘Becoming Astrid’

Swedish author Astrid Lindgren is mostly remembered for Pippi Longstocking and Karlsson-on-the-Roof book series. Her numerous titles have been translated into 85 languages and published in more than 100 countries. Now, everyone will have a chance to see what teenage Astrid’s life was before she became this literary giant – Becoming Astrid opened November 23 in LA and NY. The film was directed by female writer-director Pernille Fischer Christensen.

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‘The Long Dumb Road’ offers modern take on buddy-road movie

For audiences who love annual viewings of Planes, Trains, and Automobiles, there’s a new road comedy out in select theaters and on-demand. The Long Dumb Road is a bit of left turn from Hannah Fidell, whose previous dramas A Teacher and 6 Years, focused on deeply flawed women. The Long Dumb Road may be a […]

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Dumplin’ Author Julie Murphy On the Journey from Page to Screen

As Netflix’s adaptation of her bestselling novel Dumplin’ makes its debut, Murphy talks to FF2 Media about the experience of seeing her passion project reinterpreted onscreen.

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DOC NYC: Sarah Teale & Lisa F. Jackson talk ‘Patrimonio’

Each and every year at DOC NYC Film Festival, the films are extraordinary, providing insight and knowledge about topics, many of which were previously unknown. This year, we have a classic David versus Goliath tale in Baja Sur, Mexico thanks to the dedicated talent and determination of filmmakers Sarah Teale and Lisa F. Jackson with […]

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DOC NYC: ‘Care to Laugh’ shows humor, hope of caregivers

In Care to Laugh, comic Jesus Trejo balances his life each and every day as he cares for his elderly parents and perfects his art as a comedian in Los Angeles. Care to Laugh will play at the DOC NYC Film Festival on Wednesday, Nov. 14 and Thursday, Nov. 15.

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DOC NYC: Gudrun Schyman talks ‘The Feminist: a Swedish Inspiration’

DOC NYC and New York Women in Film & Television presented the International premiere of The Feminist: a Swedish Inspiration on Saturday, November 10 at Cinepolis Chelsea. Produced by Helene Granqvist and directed by Hampus Linder, the documentary is an intimate portrait of Gudrun Schyman—a living icon among feminist supporters in Sweden. As a candid politician, she does not hide her difficulties in balancing family life, alcoholism and the multitude of barriers she has had to overcome as a feminist politician.

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Von Trotta pays tribute to cinematic mentor in ‘Searching for Ingmar Bergman’

In the intimate documentary Searching for Ingmar Bergman, von Trotta explores the brilliance of his cinema and understand the man.

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‘Distant Constellation’ captures essence of disappearing community

Filmed over a six-year period, Shevaun Mizrahl’s debut film Distant Constellation required a slow and steady approach. The meditative film focuses on the final years of several seniors living in a Istanbul retirement home, all while the neighborhood they live in is being torn down and redeveloped.

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Alicia Malone’s ‘The Female Gaze’ highlights essential movies from female filmmakers

Film reporter and author Alicia Malone highlights 52 female-directed films in her new book, “The Female Gaze.” She argues that the male lens and perspective is objectifying women in film rather than showing women as they are.

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Normalizing the conversation around medical marijuana in ‘Weed the People’

Abby Epstein brings to our attention a documentary about a subject few know to think twice about: cannabis as a life-saving drug. Having been marked as a schedule I level drug, it has had a bad reputation for the past 100 years. Blinded by this, we are turned away from any possible benefits that this drug could have. “Weed the People” follows a number of families who desperately look to cannabis as an alternative treatment to save their children from cancer. With her film, Epstein asks the vital question: why has the government put a ban on medical marijuana if it truly helps treat illnesses?

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A political firebrand gets his closeup in Toby Perl Freilich’s ‘Moynihan’

15 years after Moynihan’s death, directors Toby Perl Freilich and Joseph Dorman released Moynihan, a comprehensive and incisive documentary chronicling the life and career of the Washington fixture. Here, Freilich talks to FF2 about digging into Moynihan’s past, revisiting his polemic work, and fighting to preserve his legacy.

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‘On Her Shoulders’ captures the struggle after survival

Just a few weeks ago Nadia Murad made headlines when she became the first Iraqi to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for her work helping victims of genocide and human trafficking. Her advocacy comes from her own devastating experience as a victim of Yazidi genocide and being taken into slavery by members of ISIS for […]

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