Currently Browsing: chicago

The Imagination of Colleen Atwood: From Period Drama to Fantasy

When you think of Tim Burton’s films, you likely immediately think of the brilliant and fantastical costume design. From Anne Hathaway’s all-white ensemble as the White Queen in Alice in Wonderland to Johnny Depp’s black leather and silver metal outfit as the titular character in Edward Scissorhands, the costumes set the tone for the film.read more.

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Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley Challenges Video Game Audiences

I had the opportunity to see Chicago-based exhibition space Wrightwood 659’s Difference Machines: Technology and Identity in Contemporary Art that showcases the work of 17 contemporary artists about technology and art. One of the pieces that particularly hit me was Artistic Technologist (or TechNerd) Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley’s video game piece WE ARE HERE BECAUSE OF THOSE THAT ARE NOT (2020). read more.

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Faith Ringgold and Her Pop Art-Style Political Posters

Art and politics can be a mixed bag. Art with political messages can be truly powerful and may inspire change. And it can be derided as mere propaganda. I’m inclined to agree with George Orwell’s famous quotation “all art is propaganda.” It’s just a matter of how overt the political message is (and absence of political ideas is also a political choice).read more.

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Stretching Time with Rozi Plain’s Album ‘Prize’

There’s a kind of waking-dream quality to Rozi Plain’s Prize. Or perhaps, it’s a dreaming wakefulness.

It is the album cover draws me in first – Rozi, backdropped by lake water, her hat flying in mid-air. We don’t see the ground that she stands on, just the lake, her arms outstretched before her, though also mostly out of frame, making the gesture incomplete.… read more.

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Eating Together: Judy Chicago’s ‘Herstory’ at New Museum in NYC

Art heals. I spend a great deal of time reading and writing about that healing as critically as possible: How well and how much does art heal? When is it too late, when is it insufficient and when has it left out those who need it most? 

But in this immediate cultural moment, after news of an ongoing humanitarian crisis remains on our feeds, and New York City continues its own social struggles, I approached the New Museum’s Herstory, a first retrospective of American artist Judy Chicago, with nothing but the urgency to seek out art as a salve for this aching feeling.read more.

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Betye Saar on Film: Life, Art, and Lasting Creativity

The Black Harvest Film Festival runs through November 16th at the Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago. While there, I viewed Betye Saar: Ready to Be a Warrior. Angela Robinson Witherspoon’s candid documentary peels back many layers of the iconic artist, activist, and teacher, Betye Saar. Betye has been in the art industry for over six decades.read more.

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