Currently Browsing: November 2014

THE BABADOOK

“Amelia” (Essie Davis) comes undone in this excellent Australian drama about a young widow locked in a deteriorating co-dependency with her young son “Samuel” (Noah Wiseman). Is The Babadook a psychological thriller or a horror flick? I choose to think shrink because writer/director Jennifer Kent carefully sets the timeframe before events get nuts… But see The […]

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REMOTE AREA MEDICAL

For one weekend, the NASCAR speedway in Bristol, Tennessee is transformed into a hub of pop up medical care… and boy do local people need it! Prospective patients start arriving days in advance–camping out in their cars–so they can be sure of getting a precious admission ticket. Heart-breaking & inspiring, & probably relevant to almost […]

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THE RULE

Opens today in NYC. Review coming soon.

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A GIRL WALKS HOME…

Full Title = A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night Weird and exhilarating vampire film set in a mythical Iranian nightscape called “Bad City” (although it was actually filmed outside LA). “The Girl” (Sheila Vand) prowls the dark streets of Bad City covered by her black chador, preying on low life scum. Then she meets “Arash” […]

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BAD HAIR

Writer/Director Mariana Rondón’s coming-of-age film Pelo Malo (also known as Bad Hair) is a Venezuelan tale about a boy in search of his identity. Originally screened in the at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival, the film tackling homophobia, racism and poverty is worth the watch. (BKP: 4/5) Review by Managing Editor Brigid K. Presecky Set […]

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FOOD CHAINS

Opens tomorrow in NYC. Review coming soon.

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STONES IN THE SUN

Opens tomorrow in NYC. Review coming soon.

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THE SLEEPWALKER

Review of The Sleepwalker by Associate Editor Brigid K. Presecky Mona Fastvold’s thriller The Sleepwalker tells the ominous story of two-half sisters and the eerie unfolding of their family secrets. The dreary indie film begins with “Kaia” (Gitte Witt) and her boyfriend “Andrew” (Christopher Abbott) living in an inherited estate centered in the woodlands of […]

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ALWAYS WOODSTOCK

Guilty Pleasure about a girl who gives up the “cool life” in Manhattan & returns to her rural roots so she can be a singer/songwriter in the tradition of gals from the last generation like Joni Mitchell (represented here by the Katey Sagal character “Lee Ann”). Allison Miller is fine as “Catherine,” but the star […]

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BEYOND THE LIGHTS

In 1992, audiences swooned over The Bodyguard, and now that Whitney Houston is gone, many of us are likely to remember her as she appears in this film. Alas, Beyond the Lights–in which a pop star once again falls for the stand-up guy who has been hired to protect her–plays like a pale copy. Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Nate Parker are both […]

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MISS MEADOWS

Review of Miss Meadows by Associate Editor Brigid K. Presecky These boots are made for walking … quickly out of the theater. Karen Leigh Hopkins’ bizarre Miss Meadows tells a dark, sometimes-funny story in the world of an elementary school teacher moonlighting as a vigilante. Katie Holmes is perfectly cast as the eccentric, prim-and-proper “Miss […]

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21 YEARS: RICHARD LINKLATER

New BioDoc is like a big, fat, wet Frat House kiss to Peter Pan director Richard Linklater, which is ironic because this latest film is, in fact, Boyhood. We have liked many of his films, so it should be fun to run through old clips, but Dunaway/Wood are too star-struck to do justice to their […]

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GETTING TO THE NUTCRACKER

Dancer Serene Meshel-Dillman’s debut film Getting to the Nutcracker documents Los Angeles’ Marat Daukayev School of Ballet at its most creative and grueling time of year, the production of the Nutcracker. Inspired by Jill Krementz’ children’s book “A Very Young Dancer,” Meshel-Dillman captures the charm and excitement of growing up onstage as part of such […]

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PELICAN DREAMS

Call me hard-hearted, but there is only so long I can tolerate overly-anthropomorphic nature films about creatures who suffer for the sins of man. Director Judy Irving has wonderful footage of Pacific pelicans in the wild, but once they are captured–usually because they are ill &/or injured–she turns her subjects into pets, and starts writing […]

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SEASONS OF LOVE

Opens today in NYC. Review coming soon.

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LITTLE WHITE LIE

Little White Lie is a stunning documentary by Lacey Schwartz about a childhood mired in false assumptions… A young girl named Lacey Schwartz grows up in a comfortable and supportive Jewish family in Woodstock, New York. Everyone knows her and loves her, and when she expresses vague anxieties about her curly hair and her skin color, […]

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