Currently Browsing: August 2017

BEACH RATS (2017): Review by Katusha Jin

After a successful debut with It Felt Like Love, writer-director Eliza Hittman brings to the screen Beach Rats. She partners with Director of Photography Hélène Louvart to tell the story of a sexually confused teenage boy who finds himself lost in a world where there is no “coming out”. (KIZJ: 4/5)

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LEAP! (2017): Review by Georgiana E. Presecky

From co-writers Carol Noble, Laurent Zeitoun and Eric Summer, Leap! is an ambitious animated feature that falls just short of its intended message. With a talented cast and striking animation, it has the potential to be a sweet Parisian cartoon, but the clunky and redundant plot weigh down its charm. (GEP: 3.5/5)

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LEMON (2017): Review by Brigid K. Presecky

Janicza Bravo’s obscure comedy follows middle-aged Isaac Lachmann (Brett Gelman) whose acting career and love life are at a standstill. What can be categorized as a satire/parody on life, love and family, Lemon balances a fine line of brilliant and bizarre. (BKP: 3.5/5)

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POLINA (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

Written and co-directed by Valérie Müller, Polina is an incredible work of multi-media storytelling, with a soundtrack by Philip Glass and dances choreographed by the acclaimed Angelin Preljoçaj supporting an already masterful screenplay. (AEL: 5/5)

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RANCHER, FARMER, FISHERMAN (2017): Review by Eliana M. Levenson

Based on the novel of the same name by author Miriam Horn, Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman directed by Susan Froemke and John Hoffman and co-directed by Beth Aala, explores the environmental impact of the ranching, farming, and fishing communities in a way that feels more like an educational piece than an impactful, theatrical documentary. (EML: 3/5)

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LOGAN LUCKY (2017): Review By Katharine Cutler

Written by Rebecca Blunt and directed by Steven Soderbergh, Logan Lucky is yet another exciting heist movie that keeps you guessing. Through bad Southern accents and a sluggish story, this film misses one too many beats to make it the next Ocean’s 11. (KAC: 3/5)

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AFTER LOVE (2016): Review by Katusha Jin

After Love, originally titled L’Economie du couple, depicts a couple that is finally reaching the end of their relationship after 15 years of trying to build a life together. Director Joachim Lafosse partners with writers Mazarine Pingeot and Fanny Burdino, and together, they deliver a feature where the reality of the stresses and burdens of everyday life replace romance. (KIZJ: 4/5)

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THE FARTHEST (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

In documentary The Farthest, writer and director Emer Reynolds captures the courage and poignancy of this endeavor, of sending a piece of humanity into the unknown, where it will outlive us all. (AEL: 4/5)

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IN THIS CORNER OF THE WORLD (2016): Review by Roza Melkumyan

Based on Fumiyo Kono’s critically acclaimed manga of the same name, writer Chie Uratani and director Sunao Katabuchi bring In This Corner of the World (Kono sekai no katasumi ni) to the screen with breathtaking animation and a compelling story of one family’s resilience. (RMM: 4.5/5)

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PLANETARIUM (2016): Review by Giorgi Plys-Garzotto

Directed by Rebecca Zlotowski and starring Natalie Portman and Lily-Rose Depp, Planetarium follows two American sisters in pre-war France who make their living performing as mediums. They are hired by a French movie studio head who wants to document their abilities, and who becomes increasingly obsessed with them. (GPG: 3.5/5)

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WHOSE STREETS? (2017): Review By Lindsy Bissonnette

Every now and then a film comes along and acts as a much needed wakeup call. As we “like” and “retweet” images and articles, the horrors of Ferguson remain a reality to the residents affected by police brutality. Whose Streets? is a documentary you won’t want to miss. Directed by Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis, […]

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FUN MOM DINNER (2017): Review by Giorgi Plys-Garzotto

Alethea Jones’ Fun Mom Dinner is a charming but unoriginal addition to the genre of “group of busy urban friends without much time to go out has a rare wild night together, which quickly goes off the rails due to drugs, crime, or sexual escapades the characters would not usually participate in.” (GPG: 3/5) Review […]

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STEP (2017): Review By Roza Melkumyan

At the Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women (BLSYW), low-income students of color work toward a better future. A celebration of life and dance in the face of adversity, director Amanda Lipitz’s documentary chronicles BLSYW’s inaugural class’s senior year as they perfect their step dance routines while applying for universities. (RMM: 4/5) Review by FF2 […]

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THIS TIME TOMORROW (2016): Review by Brigid Presecky

Writer-director Lina Rodriguez follows the life of a single family living in Colombia’s capital city in This Time Tomorrow (Manana a esta hora). Her straightforward direction and simplistic storytelling create a moving look at the minutiae of everyday life, but makes for an ultimately slow moving-going experience. (BKP: 4/5) Review by Managing Editor Brigid K. […]

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