Currently Browsing: October 2017

HEAL (2017): Review by Katusha Jin

Inspired by The Biology of Belief by Bruce Lipton and Dying To Be Me by Anita Moorjani, Gores’ film is made to take its audience on a spiritually and scientifically inquisitive journey. (KIZJ: 4/5)

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THE DIVINE ORDER (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

In her film The Divine Order (in German, Die göttliche Ordnung), writer and director Petra Volpe presents an account of women’s real-life fight against injustice. (RMM: 4/5)

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FÉLICITÉ (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

You never quite know what Félicité is thinking, because even in her wise, self-effacing love for other people, she always seems to be keeping a secret of her own. (AEL: 5/5)

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MAYA DARDEL (2107): Review by Malin Jornvi

Co-directors and co-writers Magdalena Zyzak and Zachary Cotler’s creation is a disturbing and nightmarish meditation on reputation, power, loneliness, creativity, and the body of the aging woman. (MJJ: 3.5/5)

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NOVITIATE (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

A debut narrative feature from writer and director Margaret Betts, Novitiate explores the secret world of nuns and would-be nuns, and of what motivates their choice to stay in convents their entire adult lives. The movie is set in the the 1960s, when convents were dealing with the changes issued from the Pope, collectively called […]

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NEVER HERE (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

Never Here is an ambitious debut narrative feature from writer and director Camille Thoman. While the execution could have been more graceful, Thoman’s illustration of an artist’s trajectory is compelling, and definitely worth a watch. (AEL: 4/5)

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A SILENT VOICE (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

When a young boy decides to bully the new deaf girl in class she transfers elementary schools and the rest of the class turns on him. Years later, this same young man is determined to find the girl he bullied and make amends for the terrible things he has done. (RMM: 4/5)

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ONE OF US (2017): Review by Rachel Kastner

One of Us, a new Netflix documentary by Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing tells the heart-breaking stories of individuals leaving the Hasidic lifestyle. This documentary empathetically shows the real anger and communal hatred towards these individuals by their former friends and family, and shows how difficult of a decision it is for these people to leave […]

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THE DEPARTURE (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

In her documentary, director and writer Lana Wilson quietly captures the pain and profundity in the struggle between life and death via an unconventional Buddhist priest. (RMM: 4/5)

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HUMAN FLOW (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

Linger on people as they walk, hold their young children, tell their stories, and often cry. It becomes incredibly difficult for the audience not to address their reactions to it. Empathy on this scale is only an ideal, but the documentarians of Human Flow make an impressive attempt at reaching it. (AEL: 5/5)

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PROFESSOR MARSTON & THE WONDER WOMEN (2017): Review by Malin Jornvi

Professor Marston and the Wonder Woman is the fictional behind-the-scenes flick about the creators of the comic book heroine Wonder Woman. Director and writer Angela Robinson’s story is as visceral and multifaceted as its muse, if given the open-minded attention it deserves. MJJ: 4/5

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M.F.A. (2017): Review by Katusha Jin

From a censored artist who is afraid to get messy, to a rape victim-turned vigilante, director Natalia Leite and writer Leah Mckendrick aren’t afraid to bare all in their unconventional movie M.F.A. (KIZJ: 3.5/5)

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SIGNATURE MOVE (2017): Review by Eti Or

Signature Move — directed by American artist/filmmaker Jennifer Reeder — is very sweet and a lot of fun. The two Chicago girls — Alma and Zaynab — are easy to love and the story seems to tell itself effortlessly. Coming out to one’s family is clearly harder when the family is traditional/conservative one, but the film cheers for those […]

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BENDING THE ARC (2017): Review by Malin Jornvi

Co-directors Kief Davidson and Perdro Kos and screenwriter Cori Sheperd Stern team up with passionate friends and start building long-lasting community-based systems— proving it is possible to change the world. (MJJ: 4.5/5)

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CHAVELA (2017): Review by Giorgi Plys-Garzotto

Chavela profiles the public success and private turbulence in the life of legendary Mexican singer and lesbian icon Chavela Vargas. Chavela’s life story is at once inspirational and sobering as this film paints a full, unflinching picture of Vargas’s struggles. (GPG: 4.5/5)

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FACES PLACES (2017): Review by Malin Jörnvi 

Faces Places is about faces and places and the stories they tell. Along the way they explore stories, memories, and, pretentiously or enchantingly, remind us about the human in humanity. (MJJ: 4/5)

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MY LITTLE PONY: THE MOVIE (2017): Review by Georgi Presecky

From screenwriters Meghan McCarthy, Rita Hsiao and Michael Vogel comes My Little Pony: The Movie. Though undoubtedly a fun and colorful musical, the beloved franchise is probably better suited to its small-screen format, with long lulls that make its 100 minutes more tedious than enjoyable. (GEP: 3/5)

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TAKE EVERY WAVE: THE LIFE OF LAIRD HAMILTON (2017): Review by Elyse Thaler

Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton explores the infamous daredevil, Laird Hamilton, in an attempt to unlock the secret behind Laird’s insatiable appetite for the ocean and the dangerous waves it creates.Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton explores the infamous daredevil, Laird Hamilton, in an attempt to unlock the secret behind Laird’s insatiable appetite for the ocean and the dangerous waves it creates.Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton explores the infamous daredevil, Laird Hamilton, in an attempt to unlock the secret behind Laird’s insatiable appetite for the ocean and the dangerous waves it creates. (EBT: 5/5)

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Take My Nose…Please! (2017)

Director Joan Kron digs deep in this close-to-home doc about the good, bad, and the ugly moments of living in the limelight. Regardless of your understanding and involvement in show business, this is not to be missed! (LMB: 4.5/5) 

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BLOOD STRIPE (2016): Review by Malin Jornvi

Blood Stripe is a subtle, and yet violent, critique of American veteran treatment. In Blood Stripe, director and co-writer Remy Auberjonois and writer Kate Nowlin force us to reflect on the veterans around us (MJJ: 4/5)

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I AM ANOTHER YOU (2017): Review by Giorgi Plys-Garzotto

When documentarian Nanfu Wang meets a boy named Dylan at a hostel, she becomes fascinated by his lifestyle, and decides to live on the streets with him. While beautifully shot, the glaring omission of white privilege in I Am Another You’s treatment of street life is intellectually dishonest. (GPG: 2.5/5)

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THE PATHOLOGICAL OPTIMIST (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

Directed by Miranda Bailey, The Pathological Optimist is a documentary on the fascinating and disturbing case of Andrew Wakefield, the British researcher responsible for the anti-vaccination movement. (AEL: 3.5/5)

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STOPPING TRAFFIC (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

Director Sadhvi Siddhali Shree finds a common thread among child exploitation, pornography, and the uses of social media in this hard-hitting documentary and urges the viewer to join the battle against sex-trafficking. (RMM: 4/5)

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THE UNTOLD TALES OF ARMISTEAD MAUPIN (2017): Review by Lindsy Bissonnette

Director Jennifer M. Kroot dives deep into the mind and past of Armistead Maupin in this gripping and revealing documentary. The Untold Tales of Armistead Maupin reveals the man behind the pen, and you won’t want to miss it. (LMB: 4.5/5)

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