Currently Browsing: November 2017

THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

Written by Susan Coyne based on a book by Les Standiford, The Man Who Invented Christmas re-imagines the classic novel A Christmas Carol. Though not as full of fantasy and pathos as the original story of A Christmas Carol, Dickens’s personal journey makes for a charming Christmas movie. (AEL: 3.5/5)

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MR. ROOSEVELT (2017): Review by Elyse Thaler

Mr. Roosevelt, written, directed, and starring Noël Wells, is a quirky comedy that follows struggling comedian, “Emily Martin.” Brought back to her hometown by the death of her cat, Mr. Roosevelt, Emily discovers everything has changed while she is still the same person she was. (EBT: 4/5)

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BIG SONIA (2016): Review by Rachel Kastner

Big Sonia, produced by Leah Warshawski, is a heartfelt documentary that chronicles Holocaust survivor Sonia Warshawski’s life. Complete with interviews of family and adoring friends and colorful animation, Big Sonia is a poignant documentary that capturing a story everyone should hear. (RAK: 5/5)

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REBELS ON POINTE (2017): Review by Katusha Jin

Bobbi Jo Hart writes, directs, and films the intimate feature documentary, Rebels on Pointe. Following her previous award-winning work, this film is a gem that celebrates the male, drag ballet company, Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo. Hart creates an in-depth look at ballet from a very different perspective. (KIZJ: 4.5/5)

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ATOMIC HOMEFRONT (2017): Review by Malin Jornvi

Director Rebecca Cammisa’s documentary is a testament to the minimizing and denying by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the danger that exists in North County, and how the sacrifice of war is always  the greatest in communities furthest from the decision-makers in Washington D.C. (MJJ: 4.5/5).

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COOK OFF! (2007): Review by Amelie Lasker

In the ensemble-mockumentary vein of 2000’s Best In Show, Cook Off! is a comedy about a cooking contest, in which a group of finalists compete for the million dollar prize. For a movie that depends on light wit, it doesn’t help that many of the jokes fall flat. (AEL: 2.5/5)

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THE BREADWINNER (2017): Review by Georgiana E. Presecky

From writer Anita Doron and director Nora Twomey, The Breadwinner is a stunning portrait of a child’s plight in early-2000s Afghanistan. Superb animation and endearing dialogue set apart this heartbreaking piece of modern historical fiction. (GEP: 4.5/5)

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MUDBOUND (2017): Review by Lindsy Bissonnette

Mudbound, written/directed by Dee Rees, is set in Mississippi after WWII, and takes us through racism and sexism, and is a haunting metaphor: we all come from mud in some way or another, we are sculpted by the places and events around us, and are all destined to return to it when we finally meet our maker.  (4.5/5)

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SONG OF GRANITE (2017): Review by Brigid K. Presecky

The Irish biographical drama written and directed by Pat Collins (and co-written by Eoghan Mac Giolla Bhride and Sharon Whooley) tells the story of legendary “old-style” singer Joe Heaney. (BKP: 3.5/5)

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BITCH (2017): Review by Katusha Jin

Bitch is the fourth feature from Marianna Palka. Her film is a brave, modern-day satire that attempts to give an eccentric scream against patriarchal privileges, set in a suburban American family with a philandering husband and unappreciative children. (KIZJ: 2.5/5)

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DESTINATION UNKNOWN (2017): Review by Malin Jornvi

Director and editor Claire Ferguson seamlessly pulls together 13 years of collected material to create a cohesive and deeply moving quilt of an ashen past that is frighteningly present. (MJJ: 4/5)

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GOLD STAR (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

New director Victoria Negri writes and stars in her first feature-length film Gold Star, which captures the raw emotion and scathing honesty of the not-so-pretty hidden sides of ourselves. (RMM: 4/5)

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REQUIEM FOR A RUNNING BACK (2017): Review by Georgiana E. Presecky

Director Rebecca Carpenter pays tribute to her late father, former NFL player Lewis Carpenter, in the informative, emotional and timely documentary Requiem for a Running Back. (GEP: 4.5/5)

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THE LIGHT OF THE MOON (2017): Review by Malin Jornvi

Directed, written, and co-produced by Jessica M. Thompson, “Light of the Moon” is about rape and the traumatic effect it has not only on the victim herself, but on the relationships to the people in her immediate surroundings. (MJJ: 2.5/5)

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WAIT FOR YOUR LAUGH (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

Nine decades of performance makes Rose Marie’s the longest active career in the entertainment industry. Written by Christina Tucker and Jason Wise, Wait for Your Laugh details her remarkable life in the spotlight. (RMM: 3.5/5)

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LADY BIRD (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

Written and directed by Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird is sharp and easy to watch. I was disappointed when it was over, because I just wanted to keep hanging out with Lady Bird, and with the person who wrote her character, and maybe share some of their wisdom, too. (AEL: 5/5)

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ON WINGS OF EAGLES (2016): Review by Lindsy M. Bissonnette

With chaos raining down, all hope seems lost for those at The Courtyard of the Happy Way, a POW camp in China, until one man’s strength and faith helps unite them. (LMB: 3.5/5)

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NO DRESS CODE REQUIRED (ETIQUETA NO RIGUROSA, 2017): Review by Katusha Jin

Director-screenwriter-producer Cristina Herrera Borquez documents Victor and Fernando’s battle to becoming a legally married gay couple in her film No Dress Code Required. Originally titled Etiqueta No Rigurosa, this documentary spans over a few years where the couple’s love and hope for a licensed recognition, turns into despair and disappointment, which then becomes a mission and duty. (KIZJ: 4/5)

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