Currently Browsing: January 2018

THE STRANGE ONES (2017): Review by Lindsy M. Bissonnette

When a young teenage boy and his older brother are on the run, memories, reality, and fantasy blur together into a haze of chaos and confusion. The Strange Ones, written and directed by Lauren Wolkstein and Christopher Radcliff, is part disturbing-thriller, part bizarre drama. (LMB: 2.5/5)

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FOREVER MY GIRL (2018) Review by Amelie Lasker

Written and directed by Bethany Ashton Wolf, Forever My Girl tells the story of country music star “Liam Page” (Alex Roe). Tired of his fame and generally uninspired, Liam returns to the small, close-knit town in Louisiana that he abandoned abruptly years ago. While undoubtedly a romance, Forever My Girl is also a story of forgiveness, grief, and family. It’s a success of its genre. (AEL: 4/5)

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KANGAROO (2017): Review by Lindsy Bissonnette

In absolute darkness, a single shot explodes through the night and is immediately followed by a soft thump as another kangaroo hits the ground. Deeply disturbing and eye-opening, Kangaroo: A Love-Hate Story, Kate McIntyre Clere and Michael McIntyre’s documentary, is a must-see. (LMB: 4/5)

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MARY AND THE WITCH’S FLOWER (2017): Review by Katharine Cutler

When a young girl stumbles upon a magical flower, she discovers who she is beyond how others see her. Mary and the Witch’s Flower, directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi and co-written with Riko Sakaguchi, doesn’t disappoint, delivering breathtaking animation and a heartwarming story. (KAC: 3.5/5)

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FREAK SHOW (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

When Billy Bloom moves in with his estranged father, he has no idea just how tough winning over this new crowd will be in FREAK SHOW. (RMM: 2.5/5)

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THE INSULT (2017): Review by Farah Elattar

Directed by Ziad Doueiri and co-written by Doueiri and Joelle Touma, The Insult deals with the Palestinian refugee crisis in modern-day Beirut. The film gradually evolves, and is successfully able to tackle the complex issues of religion and politics in the Middle East. (FEA: 5/5)

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LOVER FOR A DAY (2017): Review by Katusha Jin

Writers Jean-Claude Carrière, Caroline Deruas-Garrel, Philippe Garrel, and Arlette Langmann, team up to write a raw and touching story about real-life romance in Lover for a Day. Set in Paris, a city known for love and romance, director Philippe Garrel presents a story of passion and jealousy on a nostalgic black-and-white screen. (KIZJ: 4.5/5)

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MY ART (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

When Ellie leaves her New York bubble of gallery shows and art students to housesit upstate for a summer, she is surprised by the discoveries she makes, in friendships and in artistic projects alike. With a casual pace and some particularly poignant and funny moments, My Art is a quiet enjoyment. (AEL: 3.5/5)

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VAZANTE (2017): Review by Malin Jornvi

Vazante is painful to watch. Director and co-writer Daniela Thomas challenges the viewers in both subject matter and execution, but if you can stay with the long takes, presented without score and without color, a slow momentum is created that leads to an extraordinarily powerful ending. (MJJ: 3.5/5)

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IN BETWEEN (2017): Review by Eti Or

Bar Bahar is a film about three Arab women who live in Tel-Aviv and try to build a life for themselves.

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BLAME (2017): Review by Farah Elattar

Written, produced, edited, and directed by Quinn Shephard, Blame chronicles the story of a young woman who returns to high school after a brief sojourn at a mental institution. The film builds a powerful, layered story that challenges typical character archetypes. (FEA: 4/5)

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YOUTH (2017): Review by Farah Elattar

Written by Geling Yan, Youth follows the complicated, deeply intertwined stories of an arte troupe in Maoist China’s People’s Liberation Army. The film begins with a young woman’s acceptance into the troupe, which takes the viewer on her journey, and immerses them into quotidian life in the Chinese military. (FEA: 5/5).

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