Currently Browsing: March 14, 2018

DEAR DICTATOR (2018): Review by Eliana Levenson

Though the premise and cast promise a clever satire, Dear Dictator from writer/directors Lisa Addario & Joe Syracuse falls short of delivering anything more than an ambling high school comedy knockoff. (EML: 3/5)

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FURLOUGH (2018): Review by Roza Melkumyan

When an inmate in a New York state prison is granted a compassionate leave to visit her dying mother, a young corrections officer who is looking to prove herself must do whatever it takes to escort her prisoner downstate and then bring her back on time. With Furlough, director Laurie Collyer and screenwriter Barry Strugatz deliver […]

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KEEP THE CHANGE (2017): Review by Brigid Presecky

Writer/director Rachel Israel captures the sweet, unique love of support group members David (Brandon Polansky) and Sarah (Samantha Elisofon) who bond over their shared struggle with autism. Set in New York City in company with romantic comedy classics, Keep the Change is a heartwarming, compassionate story with compelling performances elevating the already-fresh and funny material. (4.5/5)

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LOVE, SIMON (2018): Review by Georgi Presecky

From prolific producer-director Greg Berlanti and This Is Us writers Elizabeth Berger and Isaac Aptaker, Love, Simon is a smart coming-of-age comedy made for teenagers, but with an equally important and well-executed message for adults. (GEP: 4.5/5)

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MAINELAND (2017): Review by Katusha Jin

Maineland is a coming-of-age documentary following Stella and Harry—two of the many teenagers from wealthy families who enroll in U.S. private schools. Miao Wang’s enlightening film showcases the young subjects gaining a newfound maturity and perspective on life. (KIZJ: 4/5)

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NO LIGHT & NO LAND ANYWHERE (2016): Review by Farah Elattar

Written and directed by Amber Sealey, No Light and No Land Anywhere tells the story of a young woman who boards a plane from the UK to Los Angeles in search of the father who abandoned her during her childhood. Once in LA, she encounters many new people during her stay – some she will […]

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OUR BLOOD IS WINE (2018): Review by Katusha Jin

Director Emily Railsback and award-winning sommelier Jeremy Quinn embark on the historical journey of wine in Our Blood is Wine. Their documentary looks into the roots of winemaking and vine-growing in the Republic of Georgia. (KIZJ: 2.5/5) 

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TOMB RAIDER (2018): Review by Amelie Lasker

“Lara Croft” (Alicia Vikander) leaves her home in London in search of the island off the coast of Japan where her father disappeared seven years ago. In an ensuing action-adventure story that soon expands far beyond her family, Lara’s bravery and stubbornness are tested over and over again. (AEL: 3/5)

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