Currently Browsing: April 2018

AVA (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

When a teenage girl in Iran is caught going against her mother’s orders, familial tensions rise and school life is disrupted. Long-standing suspicions intensify, breeding distrust and humiliation, and making the lives of these characters a living hell. Writer and director Sadaf Foroughi delivers a film that is both beautifully shot and scathingly critical of […]

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DISOBEDIENCE (2017): Review by FF2 Media

From IMDb: A woman returns to her Orthodox Jewish community that shunned her for her attraction to a female childhood friend. Once back, their passions reignite as they explore the boundaries of faith and sexuality.

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DUCK BUTTER (2018): Review by Katusha Jin

Duck Butter is a romantic dramedy about two young women fed up of being inhibited by the dishonesty and misogyny of relationships around them. Starting the night as strangers, the two women plunge each other into the fast-forwarded deep end of a relationship by committing the entirety of twenty-four hours to exploring one another. But can expedited physical intimacy replace the emotional connections that are built over time and shared experiences? (KIZJ: 4/5)

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KINGS (2017): Review by Brigid Presecky

Writer/director Deniz Gamze Erguven’s second feature film (and first in English) stars Halle Berry as Millie Dunbar, a frazzled single foster mother searching for her children during the 1992 South Central LA riots following the verdict of the Rodney King trial. A timely look at race relations in America dating back almost three decades, Kings is a cinematically impressive film with a messy, stunted script. (BKP: 3/5)

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LET THE SUNSHINE IN (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

Through a repetitive narrative cycle and an intimate arc portrayed by lead actress Binoche, acclaimed French filmmaker Claire Denis explores how depressing and isolating the search for love can be. (AEL: 3.5/5)

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LOVE & BANANAS (2018): Review by Malin Jornvi

Many films are born out of passion for an issue or cause, and the visual medium is a tool for conveying those passionate messages. Love & Bananas depicts director Ashley Bell’s love and compassion for elephants as she embarks on a two-day rescue mission in Thailand. (MJJ: 5/5)

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THE RACHEL DIVIDE (2018): Review by Farah Elattar

Written by Laura Brownson and Jeff Seymann Gilbert and directed by Laura Brownson, The Rachel Divide is a comprehensive look at the story of Rachel Dolezal – a woman who claims to be Black, despite her White origins. (FSE: 4.5/5) Review by FF2 Intern Farah Elattar The documentary’s goal is to give viewers enough background […]

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I FEEL PRETTY (2018): Review by Farah Elattar

Written and directed by Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein, I Feel Pretty stars Amy Schumer in a meaningful comedy that tells the story of a young woman who discovers the true definition of beauty, in a world that makes it so hard to find. (FEA 5/5). Review by FF2 Intern Farah Elattar “Renee Barrett” (Amy […]

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LITTLE PINK HOUSE (2017): Review by FF2 Media

Director Courtney Balaker gives us a true story of a woman who led her community in standing up to pharmaceutical company Pfizer. While Little Pink House feels like a Lifetime movie, the story is still quite inspiring, and there are many admirable performances in this tale of bravery and civic duty. (GPG: 3/5) Review by […]

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LOU ANDREAS-SALOME – THE AUDACITY TO BE FREE (2016): Review by Amelie Lasker

A gentle score and soft, dreamy flashbacks give this film the feel of a period romance, though the story’s loyalty to Lou’s own obstinate personality ultimately makes it a fascinating character study. Well done, Lou Andreas-Salomé! (AEL: 4/5)

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GRACE JONES – BLOODLIGHT AND BAMI (2017): Review by Katusha Jin

Grace Beverly Jones is the electric, eye-catching, and uniquely bold subject of Sophie Fiennes’ documentary, Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami. Fiennes accompanies the multitalented artist-entrepreneur for five years and showcases some of the most vulnerable, naked, and unknown dimensions of the star, famous for her fierce personality. (KIZJ: 3.5/5)

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THE JUDGE (2017): Review by Farah Elattar

Directed by Erika Cohn, The Judge is a documentary that gives a unique perspective on the concept of Sharia Law, through the eyes of the first woman judge in the Middle East’s religious court. (FEA: 5/5) Review by FF2 Intern Farah Elattar Kholoud Al-Faqih is part of a modern-day movement that aims to challenge religious […]

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NANA (2016): Review by Eliana Levenson

Despite a powerful & impressive centerpiece for her story, Serena Dykman’s Nana documentary fails to add a new voice to the cannon of Holocaust documentaries and finds itself struggling to break free of a school project type feel. (EML: 3.5/5)

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THE RIDER (2017): Review by Amelie Lasker

Zhao has woven a story that is delicate and visually gorgeous, based on real ambitions and pains in the lives of Jandreau and his family and friends. (AEL: 5/5)

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SUBMERGENCE (2017): Review by Malin Jornvi

Submergence is a perfect example of a story that would have been better served by not employing Hollywood stars. Resisting the attraction of the many close-ups on the stunningly made-up Vikander, or McAvoy’s tantalizing and immensely blue eyes, perhaps the washy story would have stayed longer on the drawing table and a more focused rewrite […]

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TRUTH OR DARE (2018): Review by Brigid Presecky

From director Jeff Wadlow and three co-writers including Jillian Jacobs, Blumhouse’s Truth or Dare is a basic teen horror movie without many thrills. Despite its occasional scares and attempted commentary on the danger of both secrecy and blatant honesty, there’s nothing truthful or daring about this cringe-worthy film. (BKP: 2.5/5) Review by Managing Editor Brigid […]

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‘Zama’ is a waste of Lucrecia Martel’s directorial talent

In Lucrecia Martel’s film, Zama, based on the novel by Antonio Di Benedetto written in 1956, a Spanish officer of the 18th Century is stuck in Asunción (now Paraguay). Through a non-linear plot structure, Martel tells the story of Don Diego de Zama as he awaits his transfer to Buenos Aires and the obstacles he […]

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BLOCKERS (2018): Review by Elly Levenson

With non-stop laugh-out-loud humor and a truly authentic core, Blockers, written by Brian & Jim Kehoe and directed by the Pitch Perfect trilogy’s Kay Cannon, stands out as one of the funniest comedy blockbusters of the past few years.  (EML: 4/5)

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THE MIRACLE SEASON (2018): Review by Brigid Presecky

The Miracle Season is an emotional journey through a high school volleyball team’s unlikely victories following the death of their captain. Though it doesn’t win every set, The Miracle Season is an inspirational sports film with enough heart to win the game. (BKP: 4/5)

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THIS IS HOME – A REFUGEE STORY (2018): Review by Amelie Lasker

In This Is Home: A Refugee Story, filmmakers follow four Syrian families in their first months as refugees in Baltimore, Maryland. Their story is sweet and sensitive, but not at all easy. (AEL: 4.5/5)

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WHERE IS KYRA? (2017): Review by Giorgi Plys-Garzotto

Writer Darci Picoult gives us a well plotted but fairly ridiculous film about a financially desperate young woman who cooks up a scheme to keep collecting her dead mother’s pension checks. The ending also fails to deliver a conclusion satisfying enough for the build-up, leaving the viewer wondering why the film is over so abruptly. […]

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YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (2017): Review by Katharine Cutler

Adapted for the screen and directed by Lynne Ramsay, You Were Never Really Here is an exploration of the mind of a man who kills sex traffickers for a living. But without a meaningful narrative, the film becomes monotonous mess even with bullets flying across the screen. (KAC: 2/5) Review by FF2 Intern Katharine Cutler […]

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