Currently Browsing: May 2018

‘The Texture of Falling’ riddled with poor logic and half-assembled relationships

Written and directed by Maria Allred, The Texture of Falling is an attempted dramatic thriller detailing the confusing and muddled life of Louisa, an aspiring filmmaker, who also struggles with the personal relationships in her life. (DLH:1.5/5) Review by FF2 Intern Dayna Hagewood While it is clear that The Texture of Falling — written and directed […]

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YADVI – THE DIGNIFIED PRINCESS (2017): Review by Farah Elattar

Directed by Jyoti Singh and Vick Krishna (based on the screenplay by Gauri Singh and Poonam Basu), Yadvi – The Dignified Princess is a beautiful, minimalistic independent Indian film that tells the story of a woman whose courageous attitude kept her alive through the catastrophes that struck her on both a personal and political level. (FEA […]

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18May25: The FF2 Week in Review by Jan Lisa Huttner

From Jan Lisa Huttner (Editor-in-Chief of FF2 Media) Five films either written &/or directed by women filmmakers opened in Manhattan theatres this week: The Gospel According to Andre How to Talk to Girls at Parties In Darkness Mary Shelley Summer 1993 Of these five, I was able to see four. One — The Gospel According […]

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THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ANDRE (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

A documentary directed by Kate Novack, The Gospel According to André details André’s story while exploring his social impact as well as capturing his signature flamboyance. (RMM: 4/5)

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‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ is lovably bizarre

Written by Philippa Goslett and John Cameron Mitchell, How to Talk to Girls at Parties is the story of Enn, a teenage boy from London, who meets Zan, a mysterious girl from somewhere very far away. The film is beautiful, bizarre, and an adventure from start to finish. (JRL: 4/5)

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IN DARKNESS (2018): Review by Katusha Jin

Actress and writer Natalie Dormer stars in mystery thriller In Darkness. Co-written by herself and director Anthony Byrne, Dormer plays a blind pianist who is dragged into the dangerous criminal world when her upstairs neighbor commits what is suspected to be a suicide. (KIZJ: 3.5/5)

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MARY SHELLEY (2018): Review by Dayna Hagewood

Directed by Haifaa Al-Mansour (who co-wrote the screenplay with Emma Jensen), Mary Shelley is a literary period piece recounting the legendary story of Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin’s late teenage years, leading up to the creation of her famous masterpiece, Frankenstein. The film circles around many of the prominent literary figures of the early romantic period in […]

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SUMMER 1993 (2017): Review by Julia Lasker

Written and directed by Carla Simon, Summer 1993 brings us six-year-old Frida (Laia Artigas), who is newly orphaned and must move in with her aunt and uncle. Much to its credit, the film is both a heart-wrenching tale of grief and an endearing tribute to childhood. (JRL: 4.5/5)

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18May18: The FF2 Week in Review by Jan Lisa Huttner

From Jan Lisa Huttner (Editor-in-Chief of FF2 Media) Only one film either written &/or directed by women filmmakers opened in Manhattan theatres this week but it is a multiplex extravaganza as well as a giddy delight. Book Club stars Candice Bergen, Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton & Mary Steenburgen. I saw it, I loved it, and […]

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BOOK CLUB (2018): Review by Katusha Jin

Erin Simms partners with Bill Holderman to co-write “Book Club”, a light-hearted film about the lives and loves of four lifelong friends. The film boasts an impressive cast, starring: Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen, and Mary Steenburgen. Book Club is a comedic take on how the “Fifty Shades of Grey” book series pushes these Californian friends to not “stop living before [they] stop living”. (KIZJ: 4/5)

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18May11: The FF2 Week in Review by Jan Lisa Huttner

From Jan Lisa Huttner (Editor-in-Chief of FF2 Media) Seven films either written &/or directed by women filmmakers opened in Manhattan theatres this week: Boom For Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat The Last Horsemen of New York Life of the Party Lu Over the Wall Mountain (2017) Revenge What Haunts Us Of these […]

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‘Boom for Real’ transports you into the world of Basquiat

In Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat, director Sara Driver captures the raw creativity of the world renowned artist Jean-Michel Basquiat before his height of commercial success. Through interviews and period film footage, music, and pictures from the time, Driver paints a portrait of Basquiat pre-fame and before anyone was driven […]

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THE LAST HORSEMEN OF NEW YORK (2018): Review by Katusha Jin

Director and Cinematographer Mary Haverstick captures the two years of shaming, shunning, and controversy in her feature documentary, The Last Horsemen of New York. Through the horse carriage controversy, Haverstick educates the audiences about the sobering reality of how influential money is in today’s politics. Christina Hansen and Stephen Malone represent the community of working class carriage drivers, who fight a battle where ignorance is used, sympathy is ignored, and opinions can be bought. (KIZJ: 3/5)

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McCarthy brings humor, depth to ‘Life of the Party’

Melissa McCarthy co-writes and stars in Life of the Party as a recent divorcee who goes back to school to finish her degree at the same college her daughter attends. McCarthy’s third creative collaboration with her husband, director Ben Falcone, is funnier and fresher than their previous work together (Tammy, The Boss) thanks to its supporting cast and surprising depth. (BKP: 4/5)

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LU OVER THE WALL (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

Co-written by Reiko Yoshida and Masaaki Yuasa and directed by the latter, Lu Over the Wall (Yoake tsugeru Rû no utain Japanese) is infused with vivid imagination but falls flat on its character development and plot. (RMM: 3/5)

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MOUNTAIN (2017): Review by Malin Jornvi

Mountain is an ode to mountains: 74 minutes with frame after frame of steep views and the pull of dangerous explorations, all augmented by the strokes and keys of the Australian Chamber Orchestra. In addition to the visuals of sublime nature, director Jennifer Peedom takes a philosophical stab at the subject matter, but the abstract film could have gone further with the human psychological relationship to mountains left only at the surface. However, for anyone sharing Peedom’s fascination with ice and stone, Mountain is sure to be an awe-inspiring watch. (MJJ: 3.5/5)

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REVENGE (2017): Review by FF2 Media

From IMDb: Never take your mistress on an annual guys’ getaway, especially one devoted to hunting – a violent lesson for three wealthy married men. Revenge opens 5/11/18 in NYC. FF2 review coming soon!

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WHAT HAUNTS US (2018): Review by Elly Levenson

Director Paige Goldberg Tolmach provides a clear overview of the case that rattled her alma-mater, Porter-Gaud, but fails to add anything new to the twenty-year-old narrative or deliver on promises of an examination of the psychological toll the case has had on the alumni and community. (EML: 3.5/5)

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ANGELS WEAR WHITE (2017): Review by Elly Levenson

Writer/director Vivian Qu creates a sparse but powerful narrative with Angels Wear White, a film that focuses on an almost entirely female cast to explore the rape of two young girls in a small Chinese seaside town. (EML: 4/5)

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THE DESERT BRIDE (2017): Review by Brigid K. Presecky

Cecilia Atan and Valeria Pivato’s The Desert Bride (aka La Novia del Desierto) stars Paulina Garcia as an aging woman who journeys through Argentina and, through happenstance, finds meaning along the way. Although the film is only 78 minutes in length, the storytelling, cinematography and performances make a striking impact. (BKP: 4.5/5)

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EVERYTHING ELSE (2016): Review by Katusha Jin

Natalia Almada writes and directs Everything Else (Todo Lo Demás), a close up observation of a life plagued with isolation. The movie stars Academy Award Nominee Adriana Barraza as Doña Flor—a recluse who leads a monotonous life filled with rules and regulations. In this simple, yet painfully empty lifestyle, she sees no reason for change, until she loses the one creature she cares for. (KIZJ: 3/5)

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THE GUARDIANS (2017): Review by Julia Lasker

Co-written by Marie-Julie Maille, Frédérique Moreau and Xavier Beavois, The Guardians – or Les Gardiennes – depicts life on a farm in France in the throes of World War I. The Guardians is a powerful film about both intense love and intense loss. (JRL: 3.5/5)

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RBG (2018): Review by Katharine Cutler

When discussing an icon as monumental as Ruth Bader Ginsburg, questions always arise: what to show of their life and how to show it. In RBG, directors Julie Cohen and Betsy West chose to investigate her high school through law school years, her married life, a few of her Supreme Court cases, and an overview […]

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RBG (2018): Pro Review by Dayna Hagewood

Directed by Julie Cohen and Betsy West, RBG recounts both the professional and personal aspects of legendary Ruth Bader Ginsberg’s lifelong legal fight for equal rights and justice in an inspirational and heartwarming documentary that will have you laughing, crying, and ready to re-tackle the world. (DLH: 5/5) Review by FF2 Intern Dayna Hagewood While […]

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TULLY (2018): Review by Roza Melkumyan

An exhausted mother of three hires a “night nanny” to take care of her newborn daughter. The two women forge a close relationship while reflecting on their lives and exploring their notions of youth and motherhood. Jason Reitman and Diablo Cody  – the director and screenwriter duo responsible for 2007’s Juno  – deliver a film […]

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