Currently Browsing: May 8, 2018

‘Boom for Real’ transports you into the world of Basquiat

In Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat, director Sara Driver captures the raw creativity of the world renowned artist Jean-Michel Basquiat before his height of commercial success. Through interviews and period film footage, music, and pictures from the time, Driver paints a portrait of Basquiat pre-fame and before anyone was driven […]

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THE LAST HORSEMEN OF NEW YORK (2018): Review by Katusha Jin

Director and Cinematographer Mary Haverstick captures the two years of shaming, shunning, and controversy in her feature documentary, The Last Horsemen of New York. Through the horse carriage controversy, Haverstick educates the audiences about the sobering reality of how influential money is in today’s politics. Christina Hansen and Stephen Malone represent the community of working class carriage drivers, who fight a battle where ignorance is used, sympathy is ignored, and opinions can be bought. (KIZJ: 3/5)

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McCarthy brings humor, depth to ‘Life of the Party’

Melissa McCarthy co-writes and stars in Life of the Party as a recent divorcee who goes back to school to finish her degree at the same college her daughter attends. McCarthy’s third creative collaboration with her husband, director Ben Falcone, is funnier and fresher than their previous work together (Tammy, The Boss) thanks to its supporting cast and surprising depth. (BKP: 4/5)

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LU OVER THE WALL (2017): Review by Roza Melkumyan

Co-written by Reiko Yoshida and Masaaki Yuasa and directed by the latter, Lu Over the Wall (Yoake tsugeru Rû no utain Japanese) is infused with vivid imagination but falls flat on its character development and plot. (RMM: 3/5)

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MOUNTAIN (2017): Review by Malin Jornvi

Mountain is an ode to mountains: 74 minutes with frame after frame of steep views and the pull of dangerous explorations, all augmented by the strokes and keys of the Australian Chamber Orchestra. In addition to the visuals of sublime nature, director Jennifer Peedom takes a philosophical stab at the subject matter, but the abstract film could have gone further with the human psychological relationship to mountains left only at the surface. However, for anyone sharing Peedom’s fascination with ice and stone, Mountain is sure to be an awe-inspiring watch. (MJJ: 3.5/5)

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REVENGE (2017): Review by FF2 Media

From IMDb: Never take your mistress on an annual guys’ getaway, especially one devoted to hunting – a violent lesson for three wealthy married men. Revenge opens 5/11/18 in NYC. FF2 review coming soon!

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WHAT HAUNTS US (2018): Review by Elly Levenson

Director Paige Goldberg Tolmach provides a clear overview of the case that rattled her alma-mater, Porter-Gaud, but fails to add anything new to the twenty-year-old narrative or deliver on promises of an examination of the psychological toll the case has had on the alumni and community. (EML: 3.5/5)

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