Currently Browsing: August 2018

Fiercely informative ‘Active Measures’ unpacks Russia’s meddlesome history

Active Measures is a fiercely informative film that unpacks Russia’s history of meddling in world affairs and what is known about the government’s role in the 2016 United States Presidential election. While it doesn’t solve any mysteries, it dives deep into current political issues relevant to American voters, revealing disturbing political norms. The story it […]

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‘Inventing Tomorrow’ inspires, delights and succeeds

Inventing Tomorrow (directed by Laura Nix) is a heartwarming and inspiring documentary about the power of the next generation to address and tackle the major environmental issues that plague our world. The film follows 16 and 17-year-olds from Hawaii, India, Indonesia, and Mexico and gives them a platform to share their research, aspirations, and journey […]

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LET THE CORPSES TAN (2018): Review by FF2 Media

Written and directed by Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani, Let the Corpses Tan depicts the story of a gang and its leader, who think they have found the perfect hideout for their stolen gold in the middle of the Mediterranean Italian mountains. Their plan is then foiled by the arrival of two cops, turning the beautiful […]

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Puppies find purpose in ‘Pick of the Litter’

Following the birth of five puppies at Guide Dogs for the Blind, Pick of the Litter follows their journey to becoming a blind or visually impaired person’s guide for life. The documentary—co-directed by Don Hardy Jr & Dana Nachman with a screenplay by Nachman—explores this difficult path, but fails to look deeper than the numerous tests […]

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Gleeson keeps ‘The Little Stranger’ interesting

From Room director Lenny Abrahamson and The Danish Girl screenwriter Lucinda Coxon, The Little Stranger is a slow-moving, mysterious horror film that spends most of its 101-minute running time building suspense. (BKP: 3.5/5)

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‘The Bookshop’ is aesthetically beautiful but unfortunately boring

In a small East Anglian town in 1959, Florence Green (Emily Mortimer) is determined to open a bookshop despite resistance from elite members of the town. Florence befriends the outcasts of the town in order to find solace amongst the opposition. Based on Penelope Fitzgerald’s renowned novel and directed by Isabel Coixet (known for features […]

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Alison McAlpine’s ‘Cielo’ reminds us to look up

From director Alison McAlpine, Cielo is a breathtaking documentary tribute to a simple beauty we take for granted – the night sky. (BKP: 4/5)

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‘Hot to Trot’ a beautiful depiction of the alternative world of queer ballroom dancing

Directed by Gail Freedman, Hot to Trot is a beautifully-made documentary that depicts the alternative world of queer ballroom dancing through the lens of three dance couples. (FEA 4.5/5) Review by FF2 Intern Farah Elattar Hot to Trot is a feature length documentary that follows two couples for around four years as they go to […]

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‘The Oslo Diaries’ reveal disturbing secrets

Director Mor Loushy’s new documentary The Oslo Diaries explicitly describes the horrific happenings of the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. Using real footage as described in excerpts of true diary entries, The Oslo Diaries brings to attention the severity of the never-ending conflict between two nations. (SYJ: 3.5/5)

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‘Breaking & Exiting’ fails to surpass romantic comedy tropes

Breaking & Exiting (directed by Peter Facinelli and written by leading lady Jordan Hinson) is a saturated romantic comedy about a relationship that blossoms after a suave house thief interrupts a suicide attempt. (DLH: 2.5/5)

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Asian cast dazzles the screen in lovable rom-com ‘Crazy Rich Asians’

Crazy Rich Asians is a romantic comedy based on the 2013 novel by Kevin Kwan. Adele Lim and Peter Chiarelli co-write the screenplay, and collaborate with director Jon M. Chu for this long-awaited screen adaptation. Constance Wu stars as Rachel, a young professor of economics, who follows her boyfriend, “Nick Young” (Henry Golding), to Singapore for his best friend’s wedding. Nick is eager to introduce his girlfriend to his family, but throws Rachel into the deep end when he fails to mention his family’s wealth and reputation. (KIZJ: 5/5)

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‘Juliet, Naked’ carries through on a winning premise

Thanks to the filmmakers’ handle on the romantic comedy genre, Juliet, Naked is highly watchable, a fun take on a winning premise. (AEL: 3.5/5)

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‘Mile 22’ is just another American spy movie

An elite CIA task force is entrusted with the delivery of a high-priority asset to an extraction point 22 miles from home base while being chased by terrorists. Writers Lea Carpenter and Graham Roland and director Peter Berg add another unoriginal, action-packed spy movie into the collection. (RMM: 2/5) Review by FF2 Associate Roza M. […]

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‘The Ranger’ scares us with a bang

With two nominations, Director Jenn Wexler creates an atmosphere that keeps the audience on edge from start to end in The Ranger. Playing against the rules and hiding from the cops, teenagers find themselves in a secluded cabin in the mountains. Things only get worse when they enter the woods. (SYJ: 3.5/5) Review by FF2 Intern […]

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‘The Wife’ is an intricate study of marriage

Björn Runge’s The Wife is a superb study character study, saturated in excellent performances and beautiful filmmaking. Feminist at the core, it evolves to a complex and deeply satisfying commentary on marriage, family, art and career. (HRM: 5/5) Review by FF2 Intern Hannah Mayo “Joan” (Glenn Close) and “Joe” (Jonathan Price) Castleman have been married […]

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‘A Whale of a Tale’ Explores the Controversial Whaling Industry of Taiji, Japan

Directed by Megumi Sasaki, ‘A Whale of a Tale’ follows an American journalist as he explores the traditions and culture of the whaling industry in Taiji, Japan, a town that has become a site for protest and debate due to its whaling,which American activists have deemed inhumane. (JRL: 4/5) ‘A Whale of a Tale’ Explores […]

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18Aug10: The FF2 Week in Review by Jan Lisa Huttner

From Jan Lisa Huttner (Editor-in-Chief of FF2 Media) Four films either written &/or directed by women filmmakers opened in Manhattan theatres this week: Dog Days Madeline’s Madeline Skate Kitchen The Swan All of these films are narrative features (no docs) and of these four, so far I seen three: Madeline’s Madeline, Skate Kitchen & The Swan. […]

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Dog Days isn’t much to bark about

Dog Days falls prey to its own multi-protagonist structure with poor character development, hanging storylines, and flimsy inter-story connectivity. But hey, at least there are some cute dogs! 

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MADELINE’S MADELINE (2018): Review by FF2 Media

Madeline’s Madeline is Josephine Decker’s electric new coming of age film that contemplates the ethics of exploitation in performative work. From the first shot the viewer is informed that everything is a metaphor inside the teenage star’s mind, allowing the viewer to take a revelatory journey into the blurred reality of the film. (HRM: 4/5) […]

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‘Skate Kitchen’ fails to do female skateboarders justice

Skate Kitchen (written and directed by Crystal Moselle) follows a close-knit New York City female skateboarding clique and follows them through their lives of tricks, drama, and freedom, using mostly non-actors. While Skate Kitchen‘s premise and back-story are indeed valid and promising, the portrait ultimately falls short of successfully capturing these powerful women’s stories. (DLH: 2.5/5) Read FF2 […]

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‘The Swan’ reveals life as it is

Ása Helga Hjörleifsdótirr writes and directs her debut featureThe Swan. Based on a novel by Guðbergur Bergsson, the movie has won 3 awards and has been nominated for 8. The serene, yet haunting, coming-of-age film shows how a child comes to the realization that life is not as simple as it seems. (SYJ: 4/5)

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18Aug03: The FF2 Week in Review by Jan Lisa Huttner

From Jan Lisa Huttner (Editor-in-Chief of FF2 Media) Eight films either written &/or directed by women filmmakers opened in Manhattan theatres this week: Christopher Robin The Darkest Minds Never Goin’ Back Nico, 1988 Night Comes On Milla The Miseducation of Cameron Post The Spy Who Dumped Me All eight of these films are narrative features […]

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