Brigid K. Presecky 98 posts

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KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE (2017): Review by Brigid Presecky and Georgiana Presecky

Screenwriter Jane Goldman and director Matthew Vaughn bring their charming British spy franchise Kingsman stateside for an equally whacky if less original sequel. With a few too many villains and seemingly wasted big stars, Kingsman: The Golden Circle still puts a fun spin on the spy genre. (GEP: 4/5, BKP: 3.5/5 ) Review by Managing […]

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THE FUTURE PERFECT (2016): Review by Brigid Presecky

A Chinese teenager learns Spanish in her new home of Buenos Aires, imagining the myriad of possibilities her future holds. Winner of the Best First Feature prize at the 2016 Locarno Film Festival, The Future Perfect (also known as El Futuro Perfecto) is a charming, honest portrayal of the human’s ability to adapt. (BKP: 4/5)

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LEMON (2017): Review by Brigid K. Presecky

Janicza Bravo’s obscure comedy follows middle-aged Isaac Lachmann (Brett Gelman) whose acting career and love life are at a standstill. What can be categorized as a satire/parody on life, love and family, Lemon balances a fine line of brilliant and bizarre. (BKP: 3.5/5)

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THIS TIME TOMORROW (2016): Review by Brigid Presecky

Writer-director Lina Rodriguez follows the life of a single family living in Colombia’s capital city in This Time Tomorrow (Manana a esta hora). Her straightforward direction and simplistic storytelling create a moving look at the minutiae of everyday life, but makes for an ultimately slow moving-going experience. (BKP: 4/5) Review by Managing Editor Brigid K. […]

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THE LAST FACE (2016): Review by Brigid Presecky

Charlize Theron and Javier Bardem star in a love story between an activist and a physician who struggle with relief efforts in West Africa. The Oscar winners expectedly bring the best out of writer Erin Dignam’s script (a story unanimously panned across the critical board). If viewers look beyond the criticism surrounding its famed director […]

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AMNESIA (2015): Review by Brigid Presecky

Barbet Schroeder’s collaboration with writers Emilie Bickerton, Peter F. Steinbach and Susan Hoffman tells the story of an unlikely relationship set in the picturesque island of Ibiza. Marthe Keller stars as an aging, solitary woman whose life is altered when she meets a young musician. Despite any lulls, it will make viewers want to visit […]

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TO THE BONE (2017): Review by Brigid Presecky

Marti Noxon’s Netflix dark comedy finds Lily Collins in an unconventional group home for addicts, as the 20-year-old fights the grip of anorexia. In the same vein as the “YA” genre so massively popular in novels, theaters and streaming services, To the Bone caters to a youthful, angst-filled audience battling demons of their own. (BKP: […]

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ALL THE RAGE (SAVED BY SARNO): Review by Brigid Presecky

Directors Michael Galinsky, Suki Hawley and David Beilinson delve into Dr. John Sarno’s belief system that physical pain is at the root of the human psyche. With celebrity patients like Larry David and Howard Stern, All the Rage (Saved by Sarno) keeps viewers engaged with an engrossing, argumentative look at an alternative to modern medicine. […]

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THEIR FINEST (2016): Review by Brigid Presecky

Screenwriter Gaby Chiappe adapts Lissa Evans novel Their Finest Hour and a Half into the finest hour and a half of cinema so far this year. A period piece in 1940s London, a romantic dramedy with an underlying feminist message and an utterly enjoyable cinematic experience. (BKP: 5/5) Review by Managing Editor Brigid K. Presecky […]

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CARRIE PILBY (2016): Review by Brigid Presecky

Based on Caren Lissner’s best-selling novel, Carrie Pilby stars Bel Powley as a 19-year-old with a brilliant mind, muddled dreams and lack of social skills. When her therapist suggests she make a friend or go on a date, Carrie sets out to cross each item off of her “normal person” to-do list. Director Susan Johnson […]

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FROM A HOUSE ON WILLOW STREET (2016): Review by Brigid Presecky

Writer Catherine Blackman teams up with Jonathan Jordaan and director Alastair Orr for an average horror film, perfectly crafted for pre-teen moviegoers. Carlyn Burchell stars as the leader of a criminal pack set out for revenge and ransom money. Although the kidnapping-of-a-girl-slash-demon provides occasional shocks, From a House on Willow Street is more of the […]

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THE LAST LAUGH (2016): Review by Brigid

Ferne Pearlstein’s spectacular documentary puts a spotlight on the humor in times of tragedy, specifically the Holocaust. Is it okay to laugh? Is it okay to find the light in the darkness, all these years later? The Last Laugh uses comedians from Carl and Rob Reiner to Sarah Silverman and Mel Brooks to examines both […]

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1 NIGHT (2016): Review by Brigid

Writer/Director Minhal Baig tests the boundaries of time in a reflective drama about young love, fading love and one eventful night at a Los Angeles hotel. Anna Camp and Justin Chatwin star as a married couple who are reminded, by an unlikely source, of why they fell in love in the first place. A sweet […]

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RUNNING WILD

When widow Stella Davis is left with a sea of debt, she enlists the help of convicts to rehabilitate a herd of wild horses and bring life back to her ranch. Sharon Stone stars as the greedy activist opposite Dorian Brown in this feel-good, sometimes preachy Running Wild. (BKP: 3.5/5) Review by Managing Editor Brigid […]

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LET’S BE EVIL

Elizabeth Morris and her co-writers create a futuristic nightmare in Let’s Be Evil, a desperate attempt at an allegorical warning to today’s technology obsessed-society. (GEP: 2.5/5) Review by Social Media Manager Georgiana E. Presecky Kids have smartphones now. Said smartphones are slowly depreciating their already-limited social skills. We know this. The news reminds us almost […]

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Underworld: Blood Wars

Fans of the genre and franchise are more likely to enjoy Director Anna Foerster’s Underworld: Blood Wars than the average moviegoer (who may otherwise flock to the 2017 Oscar contenders). Kate Beckinsale stars as “Selene,” a blood-sucking death dealer in a drawn-out war between vampires and werewolves. (BKP: 2.5/5) Review by Managing Editor Brigid K. […]

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RESILIENCE

During the 1990s, Dr. Robert Anda and Dr. Vincent Felitti discovered the connection between emotional childhood trauma and physical health risks. While not well received at the time, by some, it intrigued and informed the masses. Their  research study, the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) asked people about their health and difficulties in their childhoods. Writer/Editor […]

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EQUAL MEANS EQUAL

From the brilliant minds of writer/director Kamala Lopez and co-screenwriter Gini Sikes, Equal Means Equal exposes the American government for the not-so-subtle misogyny that hides within its legislation. Policy jargon is broken down into simple facts as Lopez navigates and exposes the very laws that are designed to discretely discriminate against women. Despite women making […]

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THE SEASONS IN QUINCY

The Seasons in Quincy: Four Portraits of John Berger is a non-linear look at the life of 90-year-old artist, writer and art critic, John Berger. Using the seasons as the backbone of the documentary, these four unique glimpses into his past and present life are equal parts captivating and heartwarming, particularly in Tilda Swinton’s opening […]

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SISTER CITIES

Opens today (09/02/16) in NYC. Review coming soon 🙂

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WHITE GIRL

It’s every parent’s nightmare. Yes. Your baby daughter who goes to college in New York is indeed doing drugs and being sexually harassed at her artsy internship this summer. And yes. Your hard-earned 200 bucks are not enough to cover all the weed and cocaine, or to bail her drug-dealing boyfriend out of jail. If […]

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Transition to Bechdel-Wallace Test!

FF2 Media is proud to announce the launch of The Bechdel-Wallace Test! Formerly known as “The Bechdel Test,” based on the 1985 comic strip by cartoonist Alison Bechdel, the measurement of female significance in film is now “The Bechdel-Wallace Test.” The change honors Liz Wallace, a friend of Alison Bechdel and the originator of the test. How […]

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THE WONDERS

Writer/Director Alice Rohrwacher tells a sweet (… no pun intended) story of a family running a beekeeping business in rural Italy. Seen through the eyes of 12-year-old “Gelsomina” (Maria Alexandra Lungu), The Wonders (also tited Le meraviglie) is a simple, heartfelt story of a family trying to keep their heads above water. (BKP: 4/5) Review […]

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I SMILE BACK

In a shockingly different role for Sarah Silverman, the stand-up comedian gives a dramatic, career-defining performance as a drug-addicted wife and mother of two children. Although the script by Amy Koppelman and Paige Dylan falters in its bizarre, grotesque depiction of suburban housewives, Silverman’s transformation is mesmerizing. (BKP: 3.5/5) Review by Associate Editor Brigid K. […]

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THE BECHDEL TEST FEST: 2015

Founder of The Bechdel Test Fest, Corrina Antrobus, was dismayed at the poor representation of women in film. In 2013, only 15% of the top 100 films released had a female protagonist. By June 2014, less than half of cinematic releases passed the Bechdel Test (a scene with two female characters talking about something other […]

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DUKHTAR

Writer/Director Afia Nathaniel captures a mother’s fierce protection of her 10-year-old daughter by escaping an arranged marriage and fleeing the oppressive cultures of Pakistan. Translated in English to Daughter, the heartfelt and hopeful story can resonate with audiences around the globe. (BKP: 4.5/5) Review by Associate Editor Brigid K. Presecky Set in a small village […]

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FORT TILDEN

First-time directors Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers tell a humorous story of two best friends on their journey to the beach. The simplicity and relatability of the premise allows the comedy to take center stage, with Clare McNulty and Bridey Elliot perfectly executing their Brooklynite alter egos. (BKP: 4/5) Review by Associate Editor Brigid K. […]

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MERU

With breathtaking cinematography and a heartfelt message, Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth “Chai” Vasarhelyi document three friends and their treacherous, painstaking journey of climbing Mount Meru. (BKP: 4.5/5) Review by Associate Editor Brigid K. Presecky September 2011. Northern India. Climbers Jimmy Chin, Conrad Anker and Renan Ozturk set out on a trek to reach The Shark’s […]

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MISTRESS AMERICA

Written by Greta Gerwig and Noah Baumbach, the pair deliver a wonderful and original film about a lonely college freshman living in New York, whose life becomes a lot more eventful the moment she reaches out to her soon-to-be stepsister. (JEP: 4.5/5) Review by Contributing Editor Jessica E. Perry As a freshman at Barnard College, […]

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RETURN TO SENDER

On the heels of her infamous role in Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, Rosamund Pike steps back into a similar character – a vengeful, mentally-unstable woman who is grappling with trauma. The majority of the film is equal parts engrossing and disturbing, ultimately unraveling in Act Three. Nonetheless, screenwriters Patricia Beauchamp and Joe Gossett grasp your […]

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