Currently Browsing: Reviews: Q-S

Radioactive: a celebration of Marie Curie’s life and discoveries

A film by Marjane Satrapi, Radioactive presents itself as a biopic with a twist. On top of capturing the complicated life of Marie Curie, it successfully examines the hardships that come with being a female scientist in early 1900s France. (FEA 4/5) Review by FF2 associate Farah Elattar Satrapi sets the scene by portraying “Maria […]

CONTINUE READING

‘The Roads Not Taken’ is a marriage of intellect and emotion

In The Roads Not Taken, a daughter tries to find her father amid his dementia, while her father tries to find his own reality amid the many possible paths his life could have taken. The film is an Odyssey narrative playing out over multiple timelines, and from the perspective of the women in this Odysseus’s […]

CONTINUE READING

‘Saint Frances’ both unapologetic and sweet with sensitive subject matter

Kelly O’Sullivan writes and stars in the personal, touching Saint Frances, the story of a 26-year-old nanny in an affluent Chicago neighborhood who lives with the physical and emotional aftermath of having an abortion – and the six-year-old friend that gets her through. (4/5) Review by Vice President and Managing Editor Brigid K. Presecky Bridget […]

CONTINUE READING

RIDE YOUR WAVE (2019): Review by Contributing Editor Giorgi Plys-Garzotto

A sad tale of delusion with a perky animated style, Ride Your Wave is a romantic tragedy about surfing. Only anime, and screenwriter Reiko Yoshida, could have created such a thing. The film is a well-structured cautionary tale about grief, with a surprising amount of depth for its short length. (GPG: 4/5) Review by Contributing […]

CONTINUE READING

Lively and Law the only redeeming aspects of ‘The Rhythm Section’

The Rhythm Section, directed by Reed Morano, was sadly off beat. “Stephanie Patrick” (Blake Lively) loses her mother, father, brother, and sister all at once in a terrible plane crash. When a reporter, “Proctor” (Raza Jaffrey) tells her that the “crash” was actually a planned terrorist attack, Stephanie decides to get revenge by any means […]

CONTINUE READING

Quezon’s Game: A hidden tale of Jewish-Filipino Solidarity

Quezon’s Game is a drama directed by Matthew Rosen and written by Janice Y. Perez and Dean Rosen. The multilingual film stars Raymond Batasing as Philippine president Manuel Quezon, and has him working towards one of his lesser known feats: granting Jewish refugees sanctuary in the Philippines. Review by Junior Associate Beatrice Viri Quezon’s Game […]

CONTINUE READING

Seberg: A tribute to the French New Wave actress’s legacy

Seberg is a political thriller directed by Benedict Andrews, from a screenplay by Joe Shrapnel and Amy Waterhouse. Portrayed by Kristen Stewart, Jean Seberg was not only a pioneer of French New Wave cinema, but also a staunch activist, funding the Black Panther Party (3.0/5.0). Review by Junior Associate Beatrice Viri Seberg starts off with […]

CONTINUE READING

QUEEN & SLIM (2019): Review by FF2 Media

An awkward first Tinder date turns into a modern day Bonnie and Clyde in Melina Matsoukas’ Queen & Slim. “Queen” (Jodie Turner-Smith) is, in her own words, an excellent lawyer. “Slim” (Daniel Kaluuya) works at Costco. The unlikely pair are forced to team up when a racist police officer pulls them over and the routine […]

CONTINUE READING

“Shooting the Mafia”: The female photographer documenting the height of Sicily’s Mafia wars

Shooting the Mafia, directed by Kim Longinotto, centers on photographer Letizia Battaglia and her work documenting the perils caused by the Italian Mafia. (BV 4.0/5.0) Review by Junior Associate Beatrice Viri Veteran filmmaker Kim Longinotto’s newest documentary is a thoughtful and evocative portrait of an unconventional hero. Letizia Battaglia is a woman of many layers, […]

CONTINUE READING

SEQUESTRADA (2019): Review by FF2 Media

Sequestrada, written and directed by Sabrina McCormick and Soopum Sohn, has an immidiencey to it. Tackling global warming, the destruction of the Amazon Rainforest, and the displacement of indigenous people in Brazil, the drama comes close to being a documentary, largely shot in a documentary style. The film centers around a young indigenous woman, “Kamodjara” […]

CONTINUE READING

Janice Engel documents gumption of late Molly Ivins with ‘Raise Hell’

Whether you were an avid viewer of hers during the Bush era or (like me) spent most of the Bush era learning your multiplication tables, Janice Engel delivers an overview of Molly Ivins that will charm, tickle, and at times chill any blue-team resident of the year 2019. However, it seems like Ivins became a […]

CONTINUE READING

QUEEN OF HEARTS (2019): Review by FF2 Media

Written by Maren Louise Kaehne and May el-Toukhy and directed by el-Toukhy, Queen of Hearts is a chilling drama about a powerful and successful lawyer and mother whose life runs the risk of crumbling when she becomes involved with her stepson. This film is a masterfully crafted testament to the dark secrets lurking below what […]

CONTINUE READING

‘Serendipity’ doc fully immerses viewer into a life with cancer

Serendipity documents life from Prune Nourry’s point of view; the French artist directed the film as she was coming to terms with her breast cancer diagnosis. Nourry films in a personal, first person perspective, letting us see her private spaces and the inside of her mind. She uses the film as a way to fully […]

CONTINUE READING

‘Stuffed’: The art of taxidermy

Stuffed is a documentary about taxidermy. It sounds grim, and it definitely is. But it’s also quirky and beautiful, and the people who do it are incredibly refined in their craft. (AEL: 3.5/5)

CONTINUE READING

THE SKY IS PINK (2019): Review by FF2 Media

Director Shonali Bose delves into a subject personal to her as well as to the real-life subjects of her film with The Sky Is Pink. However, the issues of class and of reproductive rights rear their heads in the background of this brightly colored and upbeat film, making the experience a bit less enjoyable for […]

CONTINUE READING

‘Sister Aimee: A retelling the Evangelist’s sensationalized kidnapping

*This review contains spoilers for Sister Aimee! Sister Aimee, directed by married duo Samantha Buck and Marie Schlingmann, is a dramatization of real life evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson’s supposed kidnapping scandal. Overwhelmed by success and its daunting expectations, Aimee and her lover chase his dreams of the Mexican border — and stumbles upon an adventure […]

CONTINUE READING

‘Raise Hell – The Life & Times of Molly Ivins’ a wealth of political conversation

Whether you were an avid viewer of hers during the Bush era or (like me) spent most of the Bush era learning your multiplication tables, Janice Engel delivers an overview of Molly Ivins that will charm, tickle, and at times chill any blue-team resident of the year 2019. However, it seems like Ivins became a […]

CONTINUE READING

‘Satanic Panic’ is fun, freaky and (surprisingly) feminist

Chelsea Stardust’s directorial debut, Satanic Panic is a wild, gory, over-the-top horror film. Though it’s qualities aren’t meaningful character arcs or perfect plot progression, it will be fun for those who like gore (JRL: 3/5)  Review by FF2 Media Intern Julia Lasker Sam (Hayley Griffith) has a new job as a pizza delivery girl. On […]

CONTINUE READING

‘The Second Sun’ could have shone brighter

Aiming to celebrate the human ability to survive even the most horrific of events, The Second Sun has an honorable theme. But though director Jennifer Gelfer succeeds in showing glimpses of the miracles life holds if looked at carefully, the quality of narration is too uneven to give full justice to the remarkable plot. (MJJ: […]

CONTINUE READING

‘The Sweet Requiem’ tells powerful story of reconciliation

Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam’s second feature film The Sweet Requiem is a powerful and political narrative about the experience of Tibetan refugees. It is excellently made and culminates in a powerfully human story. (HRM: 4/5) Review by FF2 Intern Hannah Mayo 26 year old “Dolkar” (Tenzin Dolker) lives in a Tibetan refugee colony in […]

CONTINUE READING

SWORD OF TRUST (2019): Review by FF2 Media

From IMDb: Cynthia and Mary show up to collect Cynthia’s inheritance from her deceased grandfather, but the only item she receives is an antique sword that was believed by her grandfather to be proof that the South won the Civil War. Sword of Trust opens 7/12. FF2 review coming soon!

CONTINUE READING

‘Sword of Trust’ carried by fantastic improv actors

Synopsis: Sword of Trust opens with Cynthia (Jillian Bell) and Mary (Michaela Watkins) returning to the countryside to sift through the remnants of Cynthia’s late grandfather’s belongings. In town Mel (Marc Maron) and Nathaniel (Jon Bass) run a small pawn shop. The two parties meet when Cynthia and Mary try to pawn a left behind […]

CONTINUE READING

A missed opportunity, “Renegade Dreamers” is all heart but little substance

An interweaving of the past and the present, Karen Kramer’s documentary invokes the voices of the Beat generation to paint a picture of today’s atmosphere of political activism through poetry and song. While its heart is in the right place, Renegade Dreamers lacks the substance needed to make for an inspirational yet informative documentary, leaving […]

CONTINUE READING

THE SPY BEHIND HOME PLATE (2019): Review by FF2 Media

From IMDb: In this first ever feature-length documentary about the enigmatic Morris “Moe” Berg, award-winning filmmaker Aviva Kempner again focuses her camera on a little-known Jewish hero. From the streets of Newark to five major league teams during baseball’s Golden Age to his secret life spying for the OSS during WWII, Berg’s improbable story is […]

CONTINUE READING

‘The Souvenir’ a murky look into complicated relationship

The Souvenir, directed by Joanna Hogg, is a period piece set in 1980s London that follows the life of budding film student Julie as she navigates a tumultuous relationship with an older man. (AEG: 2.5/5) Review by FF2 Intern Anika Guttormson Joanna Hogg attempts a great feat in her latest film, The Souvenir: she allows […]

CONTINUE READING

‘The Sun Is Also A Star’ a well-intentioned victim of YA adaptation

Based on the best-selling novel by Nicola Yoon (Everything, Everything), The Sun Is Also A Star is Warner Brothers’ addition to the early-summer canon for young adult romance. Written by Tracy Oliver (Little and What Men Want) and directed by Before I Fall helmer Ry Russo-Young, this YA adaptation is more of the same. (BKP: […]

CONTINUE READING

‘The Silence of Others’ brings justice to victims of the Spanish Civil War

Directed by Emmy-winning filmmakers Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar, ‘The Silence of Others’ is an exposé of the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War and Franco’s dictatorship following it. The film follows a lawsuit against the Amnesty Act in 1977, which essentially enforced a national “forgetting” of the crimes against humanity committed under Franco’s rule. […]

CONTINUE READING

RAFIKI (2018): Review by FF2 Media

From IMDb: “Good Kenyan girls become good Kenyan wives,” but Kena and Ziki long for something more. When love blossoms between them, the two girls will be forced to choose between happiness and safety. Rafiki opens 4/19. FF2 review coming soon!

CONTINUE READING

Red Joan fails to invoke wartime espionage thrills

Directed by Trevor Nunn and written by Lindsay Shapero, Red Joan is an unfortunately average drama based on the life of KGB spy Melita Norwood. Although the subject matter had wonderful potential to serve as the basis of an excellent film, Red Joan gets caught up in tedious romance, poor structure, and dull execution. (DLH: […]

CONTINUE READING

SAUVAGE/WILD (2018): Review by FF2 Media

With Sauvage, Camille Vidal-Naquet brings us a heart-pounding tale of gay love in France. The film centers on Leo, a male prostitute who has sex with men both on and off the job. Be warned: this film is not for the faint of heart where male nudity is concerned! (GPG: 3/5) Review by FF2 Contributor […]

CONTINUE READING